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home : news : local news August 21, 2017


8/9/2017
Sobriety Checkpoint going up Friday and Saturday
National Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over effort under way
The Hamilton County Traffic Safety Partnership is joining about 220 law-enforcement agencies across Indiana and thousands nationwide in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign.

From August through the Labor Day Weekend, police will be out in full force, arresting impaired drivers by aggressively targeting those who put lives in danger. Expect to see increased sobriety checkpoints, roving patrols and saturation patrols.

"If you drive impaired, our officers are trained to spot you and take you to jail. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over means zero tolerance," said Hamilton County Sheriff Mark Bowen. "These enforcement efforts save the lives of impaired drivers, their passengers and others out on the road."

In every state and the District of Columbia, it is illegal to drive with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. In Indiana, drivers under 21 with a BAC of .02 or higher are subject to fines and a license suspension for up to 1 year.

A DUI arrest means going to jail and losing your driver's license. The average DUI cost? About $10,000, including car towing and repairs, attorney fees, fines, court costs, lost time at work and other hefty expenses.

Indiana law-enforcement agencies have participated in the annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement campaign for more than 20 years. Overtime patrols are supported with federal highway safety funds administered by the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute. For more information, visit

http://one.nhtsa.gov/drivesober.

Tips for a safe and fun season

The annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement campaign includes the Labor Day weekend, with thousands upon thousands of Hoosier families taking to their cars for end-of-summer barbecues, football games, lakes and pool parties. Sadly, it is also one of the deadliest times of year for impaired-driving deaths.

With all of today's options for getting home safely, there's no excuse for getting behind the wheel impaired as it endangers you and everyone else around you. Law enforcement recommends these safe alternatives to impaired driving:

• Designate, or be, a sober driver.

• Use public transportation.

• Call a cab or a ridesharing service.

• Download the SaferRide mobile app on the Android Play Store or the Apple iTunes Store. This simple app only has three options: call a taxi, call a friend, and identify your location for pickup.

• Celebrate at home or a place where you can stay until sober.

• Throwing a party? Offer non-alcoholic beverages and plenty of food.

• Never provide alcohol to minors.

• Ask young drivers about their plans.

• Friend or family member about to drive? Take the keys and make alternate arrangements.

Impaired driving is three times more common at night than during the day. If you see an impaired driver, turn off the road away from the vehicle and call 911.

Signs of impaired driving include:

• Weaving, swerving, drifting, or straddling the center line

• Driving at a very slow speed

• Braking erratically

• Making wide turns

• Stopping without cause

• Responding slowly to traffic signals

• Driving after dark with headlights off

• Almost striking an object or vehicle

• Driving on the wrong side of the road

• Turning abruptly or illegally

The Times


The Hamilton County Traffic Safety Partnership will be setting up sobriety checkpoints around Hamilton County Friday and Saturday to aggressively deter, detect, and arrest those drivers who make the decision to drive impaired.

Sobriety checkpoints have proven successful in both raising awareness of impaired driving and reducing the likelihood of a person driving after they have been drinking.

At a sobriety checkpoint, law enforcement officers evaluate drivers for signs of alcohol or drug impairment at a specified point along the roadway, often depending upon the support of local property owners for the use of appropriate land. Checkpoint sites are selected based upon analysis of available crash and impaired driving arrest data and a consideration of officer safety.

Vehicles are stopped in a specific sequence, such as every other vehicle, every third vehicle, every fourth vehicle or by stopping three, four, or five cars in succession and allowing other traffic to proceed while checking the stopped vehicles. The planned sequence in which vehicles are stopped depends on the number of officers available to staff the checkpoint, traffic congestion, and other safety concerns.

Upon making contact with the driver, the officer advises them that they've been stopped at an

HCTSP sobriety checkpoint and asks for the driver's license and the vehicle's registration. If, in the course of the contact, the officer detects that alcohol may be involved and that the driver may be impaired or if some other issue arises, then the vehicle is directed into a pull-off area for further investigation. Further investigation may involve the Standardized Field Sobriety Tests (SFSTs).

On the other hand, if all looks right during the initial contact, the driver is often on his or her way in less than two minutes.







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