The Times photo by Betsy Reason
Noblesville High School Leo Club members, including Annie Jessee (left), pose with two goats, owned by member Emma Humburg, and the Club’s adviser, NHS teacher John Smith, during a Goat Selfie fundraiser at Friday’s home-opener Noblesville Millers varsity football game at Beaver Materials Field.
The Times photo by Betsy Reason Noblesville High School Leo Club members, including Annie Jessee (left), pose with two goats, owned by member Emma Humburg, and the Club’s adviser, NHS teacher John Smith, during a Goat Selfie fundraiser at Friday’s home-opener Noblesville Millers varsity football game at Beaver Materials Field.

Who wouldn’t want to have a selfie photo taken with a goat?
Yes, that’s right.
For a small donation, fans at Friday’s home-opener Miller football game had the opportunity to pose for a photo with a goat.
You know, that lively, frisky animal with curved horns.
Goats are growing in popularity. Goats can be rented for birthday parties, picnics and weddings. At this year’s Indiana State Fair, guests could watch dairy, meat and pygmy goats compete in livestock shows. They could pet baby goats at Goat Mountain. And they could do a yoga class with a goat.
“It was kind of a joke at first, to be honest,” said Annie Jessee, a member of the Leo Club at Noblesville High School, where she is a junior.
The club sponsored Friday night’s ‘goat selfies” at the football game. For $3 a person or $5 for a group, folks could get their photos taken with Rosie and/or Butters, two goats owned by Leo club member Emma Humburg.

“It was her idea,” said Jessee, as she turned her attention toward Humburg, who brought the two Nigerian Dwarf goats from her farm, where her family also raises horses.

“We needed a fundraiser. I walk my goats all the time .. and people love them,” Humburg said.
So, she immediately thought “goat selfies” would be a good idea..

“Rosie is a very high jumper and… they both love to fight each other….,” said the Hamilton County 4-H’er. But on Friday, there was no goat fighting. “Their behavior has been pretty good, for the most part,” she said. With the big crowd, “they’re a little anxious.”

The club promoted the fundraiser with posters and news announcements at school.

Jessee said with all of the anticipation, the booth was continually busy with all ages of guests. There were dads and moms with little kids, wanting to pet the goats. There were groups of friends who thought it would be cool to have their photos taken with a goat. There was the NHS Dance Team, who posed for a large group photo with the goats. There were school administrators with their kids, who stopped by for a photo with the goats.
“I really think it’s a good bonding experience, not only for us, but us and the community to bond together over a goat,” Jessee said.
It was the first time for the “goat selfies.” But due to the fundraiser’s popularity, the Leo Club is considering doing it again.
“I think we’ll probably bring them back,” Humburg said.
In the past, the Leo Club did a bake sale to raise money. “Everyone made something that’s special to them, and we sold the items and used the money to finance specific things,” Jessee said.

The Leo Club also adopts a family for Christmas, with gifts and food items, and also adopts two seniors, who receive clothing that can be used for job interviews or to walk in for graduation.

“We do community service together with the Lions Club. We’re the younger kid version,” said Jessee of NHS’s Leo Club, which formed in September 2016, with the help of Noblesville Lions Club members, who are nurturing the next generation to take over.

The Leo Club offers youth the opportunity to serve, as Lions do.

“We’re the high school chapter of the Lions Club and are dedicated to helping the community,” Jessee said.
She joined the Leo Club because her older sister, Callie Jessee, now in college, was in the NHS Leo Club, which meets during the school day. Club adviser is NHS teacher, Lion John Smith. “He’s a wonderful person to work with,” she said.
Jessee has made a lot of new friends, “different people’ with “different interests,” through the Leo Club, and she thinks the club is good for her resume and future job applications.

Doing good in the community, she said, “It makes you feel good about yourself.”
Jessee, whose Leo Club assists with the Lions’ annual pork chop and pancake fundraisers each June on the Courthouse Square, said, “We really strive to help out the community.”
Also, the NHS Leo Club likes to support causes in Indianapolis as well as around the world. “Last year, we filled up 85 backpacks with different goods and gave them out to homeless people downtown,” Jessee said. “We collect old phones, old glasses and repair them and send me out to third-wheel countries to people who need them.”

While I was watching people come and go for goat photos, I wondered who all had already been there and who would stop by after I departed.
Later Friday evening, I hopped on social media.
Hamilton County clerk Kathy Kreag Williams had posted on Facebook a photo of herself and longtime friend Toni Dickover, who posed together with one of the Leo Club’s goats.
Williams said, “It’s all about supporting the kids.”

-Contact Betsy Reason at betsy@thetimes24-7.com.