The Times photo by Betsy Reason
Noblesville Preservation Alliance members Mike Stewart (from left), Dorothy Young, Emily Compton, Jason Compton and Mike Corbett take a rest break Saturday during their work day of scavenging three downtown Noblesville houses that will soon be demolished and replaced with a $7.7 million major mixed-use development, including a 23-unit apartment building.
The Times photo by Betsy Reason Noblesville Preservation Alliance members Mike Stewart (from left), Dorothy Young, Emily Compton, Jason Compton and Mike Corbett take a rest break Saturday during their work day of scavenging three downtown Noblesville houses that will soon be demolished and replaced with a $7.7 million major mixed-use development, including a 23-unit apartment building.
Some Noblesville Preservation Alliance members spent much of their weekend scavenging through three downtown houses that are soon-to-be demolished at 10th and Clinton streets.
They found trash as well as treasures during their exploration hunt of the structures, which had been vacant and boarded up.
“We are grateful to the NPA members who came out and lent a hand, as we saved some unique building materials from going to the landfill,” said NPA’s Mike Corbett, an Old Town resident, who lives just a few blocks south.
“And, we appreciate the building owner letting us pull the beautiful details and fixtures before the buildings were demolished,” he said.
Corbett, NPA’s board treasurer, and other NPA members Mike Stewart, Dorothy Young, Emily Compton, Jason Compton (who all live in historic homes in Old Town Noblesville) and others spent a good part of the weekend searching for and removing finds from the houses.
“We had a good turnout and hope everything we saved can be used to help save or enhance historic or even add charm to newer homes,” Young said.
The three houses, including one used as a former business, along with Hamilton Auto & Tire Co. and another house -- all in the 200 block of North 10th Street between Clinton and Wayne streets -- will be demolished and replaced with a $7.7 million 31,000-square-foot redevelopment project called The Lofts on Tenth.
PT 17 Development is partnering with the City of Noblesville on The Lofts on Tenth, a major mixed-use development that will feature a 23-unit apartment building with 8,000 square feet of commercial space.
The current properties are owned or are soon-to-be owned by businessman
Darren Peck of Noblesville, owner of Indiana Restoration and Cleaning Services. According to the Hamilton County geographic information system, three of the properties are owned by Xanderco LLC, a limited liability company created in January 2017 by Peck. He and his wife, Monica (Cox) Peck, former co-owner of Hare Chevrolet, own PT17 Development (Blake Anderson is a consultant, but also a mayoral appointee to the city’s plan commission who will recuse himself from any votes on the project, which is expected to take 10 to 13 months to complete).
Here are the five structures that will be demolished:
-208 N. 10th St. (northeast corner of 10th and Clinton), a Vernacular Victorian house, the core of the house was built before 1866 by E.K. Hall, according to historian David Heighway. Hall committed suicide in 1885 after a series of family tragedies. Sometime soon after that, the house was acquired by Noblesville postmaster George W. Ingermann, who died in June of 1902. Among his other children, George’s daughter Lillian married Elmer Sturdevant in the house in December of 1900, and his daughter Katherine married Charles Kraft in the house in December of 1902. The Sturdevants would go on to live in the house at 1031 E. Clinton St. The duplex was built around the Hall house sometime around 1900. It stood across the street from the Methodist Church, which was built in 1892. According to county commissioner records, quoted in John Haines’ history of the county, the first courthouse was in the lot just north of the Methodist Church and on the west side of 10th Street, Heighway said. The 3,096-square-foot house, currently owned by Xanderco since 2017, was owned from 1907 to 1950s by Charles and Katherine Craft and more recently formerly owned by First Hamilton LLC, which purchased the property in 2003 from attorney Steve Holt and wife, Emily, who purchased the property from the Richardson family in 1995. The house was on the NPA’s Most Endangered Structures List at one time, Emily Compton said. The house has “wider plank flooring, Italianate-style door and window trim and a massive built-in china cabinet,” she said. The house was most recently a multiple-occupancy rental property where artist Gabriel Lehman had at one time been a tenant, evident from his name on the mailbox and his artwork on the walls.
-240 N. 10th St., just north of Clinton St., is the former location of the Mystic Images Tattoo Co. (which has moved one block south) but long before that was the Anderson family home before the house was divided into apartments and converted to business use, Compton said. “We found gorgeous original porch details under the 20th century brick porch; those were not able to be salvaged unfortunately,” she said. In 1892, John Vaught bought the north part of the Ingermann lot and built the house at 240 N. 10th St. That was eventually purchased by Dr. Joel Sturdevant. He had married Lulu Ingermann, another of the sisters, in 1906. The 2,070-square-foot house, currently owned by Xanderco since 2017, was more recently formerly owned by First Hamilton LLC, which purchased the property in 2003 from the Holts, who purchased the property from the Richardson family in 1995.
-1036 Clinton St., just east of 10th Street, is a 2,224-square-foot yellow bungalow that used to be two stories, built in 1900. The house, also currently owned by Xanderco since 2017, was more recently formerly owned by First Hamilton LLC, which purchased the property in 2003 from the Holts, who purchased the property from the Sturdevant family in 1995.
-1037 Wayne St., a home built in 1930, more recently formerly owned by FR Reese 1988 to 2004, then Walter and Sara Cooner, who sold the 3,049-square-foot house to James and Judith Foot in 2006.
-298 N. 10th St., is the former location of Hamilton Auto & Tire Service in a 1960 building on a quarter-acre parcel. A house on the property was a beauty shop between 1933 and 1935, Heighway said. In 1936, William Rhoades made it into a funeral home. In July of 1939, Rhodes sold the land to the Sonny Oil Co., which built a service station on that site. The company had purchased the house to the south of the station and was planning to move it in January of 1946 to expand the business. It’s unclear if the move was made. The station became a Marathon service station in April 1946 operated by Bill Landis, then later Gossard’s Marathon. Hamilton Auto and Tire opened in 1984.
Permits have been requested with the City of Noblesville to demolish all five structures. Originally, the plans were to demolish the structures in May and start building in June, however, the project was delayed due to the COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease) pandemic. Noblesville Fire Department may use one or more of the structures for fire training exercises.
“My understanding is that they will be demolished in the next few weeks,” Corbett said.
He said there were many treasures found during their scavenge of the old houses.
“We found lots of great old casement windows, beautiful front doors, a sturdy built-in cabinet, French doors, a telephone niche and many other odds and ends. We actually had to leave a couple of bathtubs because we didn’t have the people power to move them. Many of the windows were already spoken for but there are lots left,” he said.
NPA, a 33-year-old nonprofit committed to the preservation and renewal of Noblesville historic sites and neighborhoods, is storing the finds and plans to have a salvage sale this fall.
“You simply can’t find these kinds of items at building supply stores any more,” Corbett said.
“We hope people will come check out the treasure trove and buy something they can repurpose for their own home,” he said. “It’s a great way to preserve Noblesville’s heritage while adding something unique to your home.”

-Contact Betsy Reason at betsy@thetimes24-7.com.