The Times photo by Betsy Reason
En Pointe dance studio co-owners, Noblesville’s Robert Moore (right) and his wife, Pollyana Ribeiro, teach a preprofessional-level ballet class to students Clark Rulon of Noblesville and Jillian Schene of Carmel. The studio will present “An En Pointe Christmas” for the community at 7 p.m. today and 2 p.m. Sunday at Noblesville High School.
The Times photo by Betsy Reason En Pointe dance studio co-owners, Noblesville’s Robert Moore (right) and his wife, Pollyana Ribeiro, teach a preprofessional-level ballet class to students Clark Rulon of Noblesville and Jillian Schene of Carmel. The studio will present “An En Pointe Christmas” for the community at 7 p.m. today and 2 p.m. Sunday at Noblesville High School.

Robert Moore’s story reads like a fairy tale.
The 39-year-old Noblesville man grew up here studying ballet but at age 14 left home and moved to Florida to train as a dancer.
After graduating from Harid Ballet Conservatory in Boca Raton, Fla., he auditioned and accepted a position dancing professionally for Boston Ballet and later Pittsburgh Ballet Theater, making a name for himself in the ballet world.
His wife, Pollyana Ribeiro, 42, a native of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was born into her aunt’s famous ballet studio and took her career seriously from a young age. She won three gold medals in ballet and accepted a position dancing at Boston Ballet at age 16. By age 18, she was promoted to principal dancer, an achievement that some dancers never reach. She has danced in more than 40 countries.
“I knew of her,” said Moore, whose wife had attended Harid three years before his arrival at the school.
The two actually met as dancers in the Boston Ballet, where she was a soloist and he had just gotten accepted as part of the corps de ballet. Her sister, when she came to visit, pointed out Moore in the ballet company. Shortly after they began dating, she was promoted to principal, they got engaged, and were married in 2002 in Brazil.
After a 14-year career, Ribeiro retired from the stage to teach pre-professional students at Pittsburgh Ballet Theater, where her husband took a position as a soloist and danced for eight more years. He had many great roles, including being one of the only North American males to perform in John Neumeier’s “A Streetcar Named Desire” ballet, for which a huge banner is displayed on the walls of their year-old Noblesville studio.
While Moore said ballet can be for anyone, and he teaches all ages, he and his wife have worked with some of the best in the industry and have the training and contacts to take their students, who want to pursue a career, all the way.
Moore, a York, Pa., native, who at age 3 moved to Noblesville with his family for his dad’s job with AT&T, moved back to Noblesville with his wife a year ago.
He has fond memories of Noblesville, where he as a youth acted in The Belfry Theatre’s “Bye Bye Birdie” musical, and first fell in love with ballet, studying under White River Ballet Co.’s Shannon Jenkins, who became best friends with Moore’s mother.
“She found out that I was kind of interested in gymnastics and dabbling in a little bit of ballet. She got wind of that and scooped me up and took me under her wing,” he said. When she could teach him no more, she pushed him to get advanced training. With Jenkins’ encouragement, Moore left home at age 14 to audition and study ballet in a pre-professional program at Harid Ballet Conservatory.
“I didn’t know any better. I loved it,” said Moore, who studied academics in the morning, followed by nearly six hours of dance training each afternoon at Harid.
He laughed, looking back, thinking about advice from Jenkins, who taught him to be dedicated and disciplined, about the sacrifices it took, and she also advised him not to marry a dancer, “unless she’s better than you.” He made sure to listen.
Moore smiled modestly as he led a tour of En Pointe dance studio, which is tucked away in the industrial park on Stony Creek Way in Noblesville.
The walls are decorated with photos from their ballet careers.
“A hidden gem” is how Anne Moore refers to the studio, whose instructors she calls “ballet royality.” She is Robert Moore’s sister-in-law, married to Robert’s brother, Chris Moore. The two couples are business partners who own and operate the studio.
The 8,000-square-foot facility is amazing in itself, with four dance studios, including three ballet and one tap studio. Tap is their newest program, the studio built due to unexpected demand, with classes led by Noblesville’s Gabby Morrison, a dancer at Circle City Tap Co.

Enrollment has tripled since the couple opened the studio a year ago, mainly due to word of mouth. “We had a few students, and we did the best we could with them. The word just spread,” he said.
Moore and Ribeiro do guest teaching around the nation. They spent the summer in Pittsburgh and also go to Montana for master classes. They’ve recruited students from here and afar.
They will play host in January and February to auditions for the San Francisco Ballet, Houston Ballet, Pittsburgh Ballet, Orlando Ballet and Harid Conservatory, companies that do not normally come to Indiana. “But we have excellent working relationships with them, and our expertise in ballet is the key to attracting these prestigious ballet schools,” Moore said..
This weekend, 52 of En Pointe’s 75 students will perform at 7 p.m. today and at 2 p.m. Sunday in “An En Pointe Christmas” at Noblesville High School. The studio’s first holiday show, Moore anticipates it will become a community tradition.
When I visited on this particular day, a preprofessional-level ballet class was in session and being led by Ribeiro. I recognized some of the students who performed a snippet of their upcoming holiday show last Friday in the Noblesville Holiday Tree Lighting ceremony.
This weekend’s dance show, which Moore hopes to become a holiday tradition, promises to enchant with classical ballet and also charm with jazz-inspired dance set to favorites that include Elvis Presley. Tickets are $7-$15. Visit
www.enpointe.yapsody.com.

Moore himself will perform Dec. 8-9 as a guest in Jenkins’ White River’s “Coppelia” ballet, the same ballet he performed in as a child growing up here. Read more about Jenkins, who will retire next weekend, in an upcoming edition of The Times.
-Contact Betsy Reason at betsy@thetimes24-7.com.