Teri Ditslear, who wed her husband in 1996, said, “I didn’t know he was political when we were dating. He kind of kept that to himself.” She said being Noblesvlle mayor “is perfect for him. He wouldn’t run if he didn’t think he was doing a good job. He still loves it and loves the challenge. He doesn’t hunt, fish, play cards, drink or gamble. ‘People’ is his thing. This is the perfect place for him to be.” John Ditslear (right) and Teri were hosts at a campaign kickoff Monday, announcing the mayor's run for a fourth term. About 50 guests attended the party at Matteo's Ristorante Italiano in downtown Noblesville.
Teri Ditslear, who wed her husband in 1996, said, “I didn’t know he was political when we were dating. He kind of kept that to himself.” She said being Noblesvlle mayor “is perfect for him. He wouldn’t run if he didn’t think he was doing a good job. He still loves it and loves the challenge. He doesn’t hunt, fish, play cards, drink or gamble. ‘People’ is his thing. This is the perfect place for him to be.” John Ditslear (right) and Teri were hosts at a campaign kickoff Monday, announcing the mayor's run for a fourth term. About 50 guests attended the party at Matteo's Ristorante Italiano in downtown Noblesville.
Noblesville Mayor John Ditslear will run for a fourth term.

"I'm here to announce my campaign for next May to run for the Mayor of the City of Noblesville," Ditslear, 72, said on Monday during a special campaign kickoff.

"I'm not sure that's a big surprise, but I love what I'm doing. We've got a great team, and we just want to do more," he told about 50 invited guests who attended the celebration, in the upper level of Matteo's Ristorante Italiano in downtown Noblesville.

This election would be historic.

Ditslear, if elected, would be the only Noblesville mayor to ever serve four terms in office.

But he said that's not why he's running. "I love my job. I love Noblesville. That's why I am running again."

Guests to the campaign kickoff included County Commissioners Steve Dillinger and Mark Heirbrandt, Boys & Girls Club board member Bill Taylor of Taylored Systems, Noblesville director of economic development Judi Johnson, Michelle Corrao of Prevail, prospective Common Council candidate Chris Jensen, Darren Peterson of Peterson Architecture, business owner David Johnson, Chuck Goodrich of Gaylor Electric, and others.

"Everyone in this room has been very supportive of me, and I thank you," Ditslear said.

He showed four videos that he has created in preparation for the campaign. "I even got some people to talk good about me," Ditslear said, lightheartedly. "It's mostly promoting Noblesville and obviously a little bit about the leadership of Noblesville as well," Ditslear said.

"John has been a part of this community for a long time; he really understands the needs this community has," Taylor said on the video.

Another testimony came from Bryan Mills, president of Community Health Network, who said, "John Ditslear is a wonderful person and a great mayor. I met him when we both served on the board for the Boys & Girls Club. There, I saw this person with a wonderful heart and passion for Noblesville."

The videos would be put out on social media, including YouTube. One video is already on www.greaterthingsnoblesville.com/

"The next step will be filing (to run for office)," Ditslear said. Filing opens for mayoral candidates on Jan. 7, with deadline noon Feb. 6 for the May primary, according to the Hamilton County Elections Office.

Ditslear, who took office Jan. 1, 2004, ran for the mayor's seat in 2003, while he was still on the Noblesville School board. "An opportunity came up to serve as mayor, and I took advantage of the opportunity. And he we are," said Ditslear, who followed two-term mayor Dennis Reddick.

Ditslear touted the City's 2013 Citizen Survey, which reported 97 percent of residents rated Noblesville as an excellent or good place to live, 95 percent would recommend living in Noblesville, and 94 percent had an overall feeling of safety.

This will be the first time Ditslear will officially have a campaign chairman. Andy Hahn, a 1997 Noblesville High School graduate and an Indiana University graduate, helped to lead the campaign for Mitch Daniels for Governor and then worked on Daniels' transition team into office.

Hahn is enthusiastic about Ditslear's campaign. "He's accomplished so much," Hahn said. "I think most people have the thought in their mind, 'Just keep doing all of the great things that are happening. So let's stick with a leader who has made Noblesville what it is (over the past 10 years).' He's not the kind of mayor who's just going to rest on his accomplishments. He's got ideas for what to accomplish the next four years."

Teri Ditslear, who wed her husband in 1996, said, "I didn't know he was political when we were dating. He kind of kept that to himself." She said being mayor "is perfect for him. He wouldn't run if he didn't think he was doing a good job. He still loves it and loves the challenge. He doesn't hunt, fish, play cards, drink or gamble. 'People' is his thing. This is the perfect place for him to be."

Mayor Ditslear, in his closing remarks to guests, said, "The biggest thing you can do is to continue your support. Talk it up. Why change?" he said. "If things are good, why change?"

The Times sat down with Ditslear for a quick Q&A. Here's what he said:

Your best qualities? I'm a good listener, I am a reader. I listen to my people.

Five greatest achievements? Extending 146th Street east through the City's Corporate Campus, recruiting and getting Ivy Tech Community College Hamilton County Campus, enhancements to downtown Noblesville, and the Federal Hill Park project.

Most important focus for the next four years: Keeping a sense of community, creating jobs, filling the Corporate Campus, traffic issues, and getting Ivy Tech paired with local business needs.

Greatest challenges? Lack of revenue, managing growth and traffic issues.

On economic development? In 13 weeks, we had 31 companies move to Noblesville. We want to bring more jobs to Noblesville and keep that sense of community.

Downtown? We've done a great job with downtown but there's more to do, with living, dining opportunities downtown, and making the (White) River more of an asset.

Learned in office? Have patience. You are not in control. I'm one who likes to get things done and do it today; government just doesn't work that way.

And what's the Mayor have for breakfast every morning? Cheerios.