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CRASK
CRASK
Sunday, June 17, 2018 8:16 PM

With hope. Two words that describe the way in which all life should be lived.

In his third book, The Arch, author and Noblesville native Gary Crask takes readers on the life journey of Charlie Wilhelm — a life lived with hope. 
Born at the end of WWI, Charlie lives a happy childhood with his Mama, Papa and younger brother, Teddy, near Vienna, Austria.

What starts as an innocent childhood quickly becomes influenced by the facts of life in the 1930s: polio, family dynamic shifts and the rise of Nazi Germany. Believing that her own family secrets could spell disaster for her eldest child, Charlie’s mother, Emma Wilhelm, gives her son the only gifts she can — hope for safety and a future in America.

  • Fishers plans $8.5 million in upgrades to tech park
    6/19/2018 

    The Hageman Group, in partnership with the City of Fishers, has announced its intent to build a Class-A multi-story office building as the gateway to the Fishers Certified Tech Park, located at 8939 Technology Way.

    The company plans to build a 31,000 square foot office building with a total investment of $8.5 million as lease commitments are secured.

    "Innovation companies are looking for a place to call home in Fishers, and this development provides another opportunity for growing companies to join the entrepreneurial economy here in our city," said Fishers Mayor Scott Fadness.

    The Fishers Certified Tech Park is home to innovation companies, Launch Fishers, and the Indiana IoT Lab - Fishers, just off Commercial Drive & Lantern Road near downtown Fishers. This development joins the more than $430 million in development near downtown Fishers in the past three years.

  • County nonprofit donated more than $14,000 in first year
    6/19/2018 

    100+ Women Who Care in Hamilton County, Indiana ("Women Who Care") members selected the Megan S. Ott Foundation as the chosen charity in May, which means they will be awarded approximately $4,300. This brings total donations since the inaugural August 2017 meeting to $14,800.

    "We are so excited to use this donation to further Megan’s hope of bringing sunshine to those diagnosed with breast cancer," said Arleen Haselhorst, volunteer and council member of the Megan S. Ott Foundation. "The Megan S. Ott Foundation has helped over 700 families cope with the devastating effects of breast cancer. The founder, Megan, started it to help others know they have a support group which starts right after diagnosis. This donation will go to people who live in Hamilton County."

    The Women Who Care concept began from the international organization 100 Who Care Alliance, in 2006 when founder Karen Dunigan from Jackson, Michigan, asked for help by trying to get cribs to needy mothers. She invited 100 women to a meeting and asked if they each could donate $100. Within the hour, they raised more than the $10,000 goal. The first 100 Women Who Care chapter was born.

     
  • Noblesville native's new novel offers hope
    6/17/2018 

    With hope. Two words that describe the way in which all life should be lived.

    In his third book, The Arch, author and Noblesville native Gary Crask takes readers on the life journey of Charlie Wilhelm — a life lived with hope. 
    Born at the end of WWI, Charlie lives a happy childhood with his Mama, Papa and younger brother, Teddy, near Vienna, Austria.

    What starts as an innocent childhood quickly becomes influenced by the facts of life in the 1930s: polio, family dynamic shifts and the rise of Nazi Germany. Believing that her own family secrets could spell disaster for her eldest child, Charlie’s mother, Emma Wilhelm, gives her son the only gifts she can — hope for safety and a future in America.

  • 6/17/2018 

    The IHSBCA No. 2 Fishers Tigers defeated the Cathedral Irish 4-3 at Victory Field on Friday night to claim the school’s first state championship in baseball.

    The Tigers and the Irish were tied at No. 1 in the IHSBCA Preseason Poll, so it was fitting for the two schools to face each other in the championship game.

    The Irish struck first scoring an unearned run in the bottom of the first. After a one-out walk, the Irish runner stole second base, advanced to third on a throwing error from catcher Kiel Brenczewski, and continued home on the same play when centerfielder JJ Woolwine overthrew third base. 
    Like they have done all year, however, the Tigers answered.

  • Hamilton Heights appreciates golf supporters
    6/14/2018 

    The members of the Hamilton Heights Educational Foundation would like to extend their sincere appreciation to all those individuals who helped make this year’s golf outing a wonderful success.  

    Moneys generated through the annual event, now in its 29th year, gives students and teachers a chance to grow and explore beyond traditional boundaries through grant money. 

    “We were pleased with the turnout despite the heat, we avoided the predicted storms,” said Melissa Martin, president, Hamilton Heights Educational Foundation along with the help of the entire board, has organized the annual event during her seven-year tenure (three as president) with the Foundation. “We are grateful for the dedicated staff at Bear Slide, the opportunity to play on one of the state’s Top 10 golf courses, and for their support of all things Hamilton Heights.”

  • OUT IN THE OPEN- The Sun Isn’t Your Friend
    6/14/2018 While Indiana seems to have more lousy gray days than London, England, old Sol actually does appear periodically in the Hoosier sky as we go forth into the fields to play. However, the friendly sun that shines so benevolently also presents a danger that many outdoors enthusiasts simply ignore: skin damage.

    It has been known for years that excessive exposure to the sun can cause skin damage, which in turn leads to premature aging and possibly even skin cancer. Unfortunately, those of us who frequently run amok in the outdoors often give less than a thought to sun protection even while wearing all sorts of other protective paraphernalia such as life jacket, shooting glasses, helmets and harnesses.

    Much of the problem has to do with attitudes. When Americans flocked to beaches before 1960, being tanned or sunburned was considered dangerous, more so than the communist party and skin cancer was rare. Going back further in history, British books written during the African colonial period frequently worried about the dangers of sun exposure to the point of recommending that colonists wear their pith helmets indoors.
  • Howard C. Campbell
    6/19/2018 

    Howard C. Campbell, 75, of Noblesville, went home to be with the Lord on Sunday, June 17, 2018, at Riverview Health.

    He was born Dec. 31, 1942, to Thomas and Ethel (Beam) Campbell in Easton, Pennsylvania.

  • Keith Allen Fiedler
    6/19/2018 Keith Allen Fiedler, 66, Noblesville, peacefully answered God’s call for an accomplished teacher and coach on June 9, 2018. 

    Mr. Fielder was born Oct. 19, 1951, the son of Kenneth Fiedler and Loretta Unsicker. 
  • Marleta Beth "Marty" Goodnight - Faucett
    6/19/2018 

    Marleta Beth "Marty" Goodnight - Faucett, 81, passed away on Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018, at her home in Sebring, Florida.

    Mrs. Faucett was born on Jan. 3, 1937, to the late Berford and Anna Mae (Cox) Goodnight.

  • 6/14/2018 Dear Editor, 

    I’ve been to the moon. I’ve been burned. But more often I’m honored. I’m your American flag.

    With 13 stars for colonies clamoring for freedom, I was first flown at Fort Stanwix in New York in 1777—and then carried into battle for the first time at Brandywine in Pennsylvania. By war’s end, I was saluted as the emblem of a sovereign nation, new and free. I’m your American flag.

    But challenges lay ahead. With 15 stars and 15 stripes, I survived shock and shell at Fort McHenry in 1814. With the aid of rockets’ red glare and bombs bursting in air, I was spied from afar at dawn’s early light by a patriot poet. I was then celebrated in sight and song by a fledgling nation. I’m your American flag.

    A half century later and with 33 stars and 13 stripes, I was saddened to see our nation divided. Our brothers’ blood was spilled in battle north and south. But by war’s end, Lincoln’s iconic words at Gettysburg prevailed—a unique nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. But that pledge was yet to be fully fulfilled.
  • 6/11/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    At 9:06 a.m. on May 25, an armed student entered my son’s classroom in Noblesville and opened fire.

    Amazingly, there were no fatalities.

    However, another student and my son were struck numerous times. Thankfully, both are recovering, but the injured student will have an extended hospital stay. Since that surreal day, there have been so many acts of kindness and so many notes of encouragement and prayers that I couldn’t possibly begin to thank everyone personally.

    Please accept the following thanks and know that every act, every word and every prayer has been deeply appreciated.

  • 5/18/2018 Dear Editor, 

    In the early 2000s, leaders in state government determined that the Indiana Department of Environmental Management should team with businesses to help protect valuable resources. A partnership – instead of strictly a punitive approach – has been successful.

    That is a lesson still being learned in Washington. Although regulatory efforts under the current administration are taking a more thoughtful tactic, one Indiana company is suffering from the actions of the prior regime at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

    Navient, which services 12 million student loan customers, is based in Fishers with additional operations in Muncie. The company was sued by CFPB two days before President Obama left office. Richard Cordray had spent four years investigating Navient, citing it for “systematically and illegally failing borrowers.”

    No evidence to substantiate the claims exists. The company produced 450,000 pages of documents, hundreds of hours of phone recording and more than 30 written reports before charges were filed. 
  • 6/17/2018 

    Barbecue season is in full swing and it’s a good time to review food safety. Food-borne illness is something that almost all of us have experienced at some point in our lives.

    Food-borne illness is defined as more than two people having a similar illness with evidence of food as the source. The overall rate of these illnesses has gone down drastically in the last century with improvements in food handling and sanitation. However, we still hear about illness outbreaks.

    There are approximately 76 million cases of food-related illness in the United States each year. There are also about 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Underdeveloped countries, as a group, experience about one billion cases annually and four to six million deaths.

  • 6/17/2018 Welcome back, summer! 

    Summer officially begins on Thursday, ushering in a number of events and activities for the whole family. With the warmer weather and longer days, now is the time to get out and explore everything Noblesville and the state offers. 

    Finding fun and exciting events and attractions in our community is easy, thanks to Visit Hamilton County. Whether traveling to Carmel, Fishers, Noblesville, Westfield or other nearby towns, information to plan your next adventure can be found at visithamiltoncounty.com. Connect with an online trip planner and travel guide, and find special offers for local getaways. 

    Each Thursday, the Noblesville Parks Department hosts free concerts from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Dillon Park. This Friday and then again on July 13, July 27, Aug. 10 and Aug. 24, enjoy Food Truck Friday at Federal Hill Commons. In July, we can look forward to Tenderloin Tuesday with deals on tenderloin sandwiches served at more than 30 local restaurants. 
  • 6/17/2018 

    At 3 a.m., in the absence of sleep, I have been lying here reading the Center for Human Rights website. Part of my sleeplessness is due to the fact that my ten and eleven-year-olds are with their dad for a month. In 26 years of being a mom, I can’t begin to add up the number of times I have awakened in the middle of the night, felt a pang of fear, and walked quietly from room to room to check on each of my sleeping children. Not having that ability is new to me.

    I wonder if they are also lying awake, wishing they could crawl into bed with me like they sometimes do. My youngest is prone to nightmares, and will often appear at my bedside, needing to be comforted. Is he having nightmares tonight? I try not to think about it.

    My point here is this...as difficult as it is for our family to experience the ramifications of divorce, I cannot imagine the emotional trauma inflicted on children separated from their parents and held in immigrant detention centers. How great is the fear of moms and dads who are unable to check on their kids at night? How could they even begin to sleep knowing their children are indefinitely in the hands of a government that seemingly hates them?

  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


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This Week's Events

6/17/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/18/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/20/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/21/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/23/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

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