Home | Contact Us | Facebook | Subscribe | Advertise
The Noblesville Times 24-7
Thursday, August 16, 2018 10:35 PM
A 20-year-old man from Cloverdale was arrested and charged in federal court for the July 28 fire and graffiti at a Carmel Jewish Synagogue.
Carmel Police said they received information linking Nolan Brewer and a co-conspirator to the crime and shared that with the FBI. The FBI and Carmel Police said surveillance video shows Brewer and a co-conspirator, the day before the incident, purchasing red and black spray paint and bandanas from Wal-Mart. Wednesday, search warrants at Brewer’s residence and vehicle enabled police to find cans of spray paint and items consistent with the burned areas around the structure. Brewer was arrested at that time on federal charges of conspiracy to violate civil rights. His co-conspirator has also been arrested by Carmel Police.
“Federal civil rights laws protect our rights to worship freely without threats or intimidation,” said U.S. Attorney Josh Minkler. “Those who choose to deny anyone those rights by spreading hate and bigotry will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of federal law.”
Brewer had his initial appearance hearing today and remains in the custody of the United States Marshal Service. His detention hearing is set for August 21, 2018, at 3:00 p.m., before a magistrate judge. 
  • 8/17/2018 Riverview Health is one of only five hospitals in the state to achieve American College of Cardiology’s NCDR ACTION Registry Platinum Performance Achievement Award, the highest level award possible.
    “We’re honored to achieve this award five years in a row as it truly reflects the diligent and thoughtful care our whole team provides to our cardiology patients,” Angie Bolinger, director of Cardiovascular, Infusion & Outpatient Clinical Services, said.
    This award recognizes a hospital's success in implementing a higher standard of care for heart attack patients by meeting aggressive performance measures as outlined by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association clinical guidelines. The implementation of these guidelines requires successful coordination of the Heart & Vascular team and emergency personnel, and it’s a critical step in saving the lives and improving outcomes of heart attack patients. 
  • 8/16/2018 Noblesville’s 2018 Movies in the Park Series Begins Saturday, August 25 with ‘Coco’
    The Noblesville Parks Department invites residents to enjoy the annual Movies in the Park Series at Forest Park with various movies from a Disney classic to new award-winning favorites. Beginning with “Coco” on Saturday, August 25, the 2018 film series provides six consecutive weeks of free screenings and enjoyment for the entire family.
    “The Movies in the Park Series has been an ongoing tradition in Noblesville for a number of years. Attendees can enjoy family friendly movies, bring a blanket, their dinner or snacks and enjoy an evening of cinema at Noblesville’s beautiful and historic Forest Park,” Noblesville Assistant Parks Director Mike Hoffmeister said.
  • 8/16/2018 Carmel Police are looking for your help in finding someone who might be suicidal.
    They received a report Wednesday about the person just before 11 a.m. The report said the person was in the 1200 block of W. 146th Street. However, before police arrived the person fled in a stolen vehicle. Police located and pursued the vehicle, but broke off for safety reasons.
    A bit later the person was again spotted fled on foot into a wooded area near Old Meridian and Main Street. Despite assistance, police were unable to locate him.
    Police are now asking if you have any information to please contact the CPD Criminal Investigation Division at (317) 571-2551 or Crime Stoppers at (317) 262-TIPS (8477).
  • 8/17/2018 Hello Sports Fans.
    Welcome to the Bubbling Caldron, the all-knowing, all-seeing, pugnacious, pretentious, prognosticator of sports. Want to know who’s going to win before the kick off? I’m your guy.
    First though, a few ground rules. You can call me a homer (just don’t call me late for dinner). Like the Ultimate Warrior (may he rest in peace) I hearken from parts unknown. But I do love all things Hamilton County . . . yes, even Carmel. I’m also a big fan of the kids who play high school sports and I might get on a coach or referee here and there, but never the kids.
    The way this works is each week I’ll give you a quick rundown of our local games and give you the inside scoop on who’s going to win. You’ll probably rush right off to Vegas to . . . ahem, enjoy the sights (Yeah, and you got Playboy for the articles, too). Hey, that’s how I roll. Don’t forget to tip your waitresses and waiters and I’ll be here every Friday. Let’s get started.
    Noblesville-Cathedral
  • 8/16/2018 Lady Rocks topped at home
    The Westfield volleyball team took on Greenfield Central Wednesday night at home. The Rocks improved offensively in their loss to Greenfield in three sets, 25-13, 25-18, 25-17. Westfield was led by Weglarz with 22 assists, in serve receive by Detamore and Owens, in digs by Mendler with 10 and Isley with 8, and in kills by McAfee with 11 and Daffinee with 10.
  • 8/16/2018 Since the Sheridan Horseshoe League was rained out a couple of times, the members had to play catch up this week. Instead of their normal 10 win night they had a couple of 10 win nights!
    Price Heating recaptured the league lead by winning 18 of the 20. JBS United moved into second by winning 16 of 20, eight of which were against Traditional Concepts knocking them out of first and into third place.
    Jeff ogle had his best night of the season, tossing an actual game of 81 and a handicap game of 140. Richard Law and Brad McKinney lea JBS United into the second spot. First half of the season winners Price Heating must win four games next week to take the league championship without needing to have a playoff.
  • Robert Powers Gibbs
    8/16/2018 Robert Powers Gibbs, 84, Tipton and formerly of Rochester, N.Y. and Cincinnati, died at 5:10 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 at Riverview Health in Noblesville.
    He was born Dec. 20, 1933 in Rochester, N.Y. to Paul Otto Gibbs and Dorothy (Powers) Gibbs Figaro.
  • Morris Glenn Miller
    8/15/2018 Morris Glenn Miller, 87, Westfield, passed away Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 at St. Vincent Seton Specialty Hospital in Indianapolis.
    He was born Feb. 15, 1931 to William and Martha (Hibberd) Miller in Laurel County, Ky.
  • Kenneth L. Black
    8/15/2018 Kenneth L. Black, 93, Carmel, passed away Aug. 14, 2018.
    He was born April 4, 1925 in Marion, Indiana to the late Lorne and Hazel (Gulliver) Black.
  • 8/16/2018 Dear Editor,
    When it comes to vehicle safety, the brake system is at the top of the list. Brake Safety Awareness Month is the ideal time for drivers to stop and make sure their brakes are working properly before the new school year and colder temperatures arrive.
    Motorists can put a stop to any potential brake problems by recognizing the signs and symptoms that their brake system may need maintenance or repair. Typical warning signs include the car pulling to the left or right, noises when applying the brakes, an illuminated brake warning light, brake grabbing, low pedal feel, vibration, hard pedal feel and squealing. Several factors that affect brake wear include driving habits, vehicle type, operating conditions and the quality of the brake lining material.
    For routine maintenance, drivers should check their vehicle’s braking system at least once a year. A thorough inspection should include brake lining wear, brake fluid level, rotor thickness, condition of hoses and brake lines, brake and dash warning lights, as well as taking the car for a test drive to detect other potential brake system problems.
    Drivers should never put off routine brake inspections or any needed repair, such as letting the brakes get to the “metal-to-metal” point, which can be potentially dangerous and lead to a more costly repair bill.
  • 8/16/2018 Dear Editor,
    As a member of the federal community who served our country for years, I am concerned with an attempt to force current U.S. Postal Service retirees onto Medicare Part B, after they previously declined this coverage. While hailed as a way to improve USPS' finances, this is nothing more than balancing the books on the backs of seniors. 
    Why should retirees, who spent their careers serving this nation, be forced to pay an additional $134 per month, or more, for health coverage they previously deemed unnecessary? Mandatory Medicare Part B coverage was never part of the agreement made upon employment, and it should not be forced on any postal retiree, especially retroactively. 
    Congress is currently attempting to fix the Postal Service's problems by shifting costs to Medicare. I urge our legislators to reject the current postal reform bill, H.R. 756. Retired postal workers proudly served our community and promises to them should be kept.
  • 8/7/2018 

    We, as many of you, were horrified to learn of the shooting at Noblesville West Middle School this past May.

    Schools are central hubs of our community and should be safe havens for young people. When that security is shaken, it can be terrifying for students, educators, and families.

    As much as we were shocked by this shooting, at Prevail we see the effects of horrific acts of violence in our community every single day. Everyday, our advocates help people who have experienced devastating events cope with their trauma. Everyday, kids, teens, and adults fill our offices and share their own stories of violence, emotional abuse, stalking, and sexual assault.

    Hamilton County is remarkably safe, especially when compared to many other places across the state and even the country. We have incredible assets and strengths that offer opportunities and advantages many places lack. Our schools are top-notch, our parks are pristine, our law enforcement agencies are responsive, and there’s always something fun to do. While these resources contribute to a wonderful sense of security, we cannot ignore the gaps in our community. We cannot turn a blind eye to our friends and neighbors who are struggling.

    One of the greatest assets our community offers is the wide array of service agencies and community orga

  • 8/17/2018 Wow, time flies! I hadn’t realized it had been so long since we’d had a reader column.
    The Forest Park columns generated several responses.
    Pam (Gibbs) Ferber remembered the park’s old corkscrew slide being very popular. She said it was scary to climb up the tall ladder to get to the top, but once you were on the ladder, there was no chickening out because a long line of people would be behind you waiting their turn.
    She described the ride down as “bumpy.”
    Pam has a better memory of the park’s other slides than I do. She recalled two tall slides behind the corkscrew — one that went straight down and another which had one or two places where you almost stopped, then slid down at a steeper angle.
    Doug Church reminded me how Forest Park’s old cement pool was completely encircled by a drive. That made the pool a prime spot for local teens to go cruising (or as Doug said, “dragging”) during the 1950s and ‘60s.
  • Legacy Branch helps fill need for more churches
    8/17/2018 The new Living Branch Church in Noblesville never set out to be unique or try to communicate that the church has somehow figured out something that other churches have not.
    What drives the church is the realization that Noblesville is below the national average in terms on church attendance.
    More than 80 percent of Noblesville is not in a church on a Sunday. An interesting statistic that pastor Keith Doane offered.
    And that has brought he and his wife, Susan, and their family, to plant a new church here in Noblesville.
    “We love Noblesville and there is no other place we would rather be. We pray for a desire to see many more churches planted in Noblesville,” Keith Doane said.
    “Our community has challenges in that there is little or no space for church plants to meet. New churches are coming to Fishers, Westfield and Carmel. Noblesville has had a similar growth pattern but there have only been a few new churches in Noblesville,” he said. 
    “We need many more,” said Doane, who with his wife and children and church families were found last Saturday giving out literature and bottled water to attendees at the Noblesville Farmers Market at Federal Hill Commons. They were excited to talk about their church, which is celebrating its first anniversary this Sunday at 10 a.m. worship. The community is invited.
  • Noblesville teenage singer to compete Sunday at Fair
    8/16/2018 Noblesville’s Brielle Cowger started performing on stage at 4 when she discovered her love for theater and music. 
    It was a love that found her acting and singing in an array of youth productions, including several Christian Youth Theatre musicals, where I first heard her sing.
    Brielle’s voice is sweet and pure. There’s no wonder she’s doing great things.
    She has been singing and competing at the Hamilton County 4-H Fair Youth Talent Show since she was 8 years old.
    And she’s earned the opportunity to move on to the Indiana State Fair Youth Talent Contest more than once.
    Now, at age 15, she has done it again when she won the county competition for the vocal solo category of the senior division with her performance of “How ‘Bout a Dance” from the Bonnie & Clyde Broadway musical set during the Great Depression.
    Brielle will compete at noon Sunday in the 38th annual Youth Talent Contest in the Farm Bureau Building at the State Fair. Admission is free to the public.
    While she’s never placed in the state contest, that doesn’t deter her from striving more every year.
    “It would be amazing if I placed this year,” Brielle said when I caught up with her this week. “No matter what happens though I am so grateful for, at least, making it to state.”
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


Events_Calendar

"Select a day to show the events for that day below the heading "This week's events"
Calendar
Title and navigation
Title and navigation
Move back 3 monthsMove back 1 month

August 2018

Move forward 1 monthMove forward 3 months

August 2018

SMTWTFS
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 
       

This Week's Events

8/14/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
8/17/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.

Friday, August 17, 2018

Site Search

GO


Our app is now available!

     
    



© 2018 The Times
a division of Sagamore News Media
920 S. Logan St, Suite 101 Noblesville, IN 46060

(317) 770-7777

life

Software © 1998-2018 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved