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The Times photo by Betsy Reason
Noblesville’s Susan Hill (left) plays the Stage Manager in The Belfry Theatre’s “Our Town,” by sharing her privileged view of life in Grover’s Corners, a fictional American small town during the 1900s. Hannah Partridge of Noblesville (right) portrays Professor WIllard in the play, which continues through Sept. 30.
The Times photo by Betsy Reason Noblesville’s Susan Hill (left) plays the Stage Manager in The Belfry Theatre’s “Our Town,” by sharing her privileged view of life in Grover’s Corners, a fictional American small town during the 1900s. Hannah Partridge of Noblesville (right) portrays Professor WIllard in the play, which continues through Sept. 30.
Saturday, September 22, 2018 4:00 AM
Have you ever wondered how actors remember all of their lines? 
How do they deliver flawlessly night after night? Does it get easier? Are there moments that their mind goes blank? Does a live audience make them nervous?
As show producer of The Belfry Theatre’s “Our Town” drama, which is in its second weekend of an eight-show run, I had the opportunity on Friday morning to have a conversation with Noblesville’s Susan Hill. She plays the role of Stage Manager in the play, celebrating its 80th year and which continues through Sept. 30 at the Noblesville theater. Tickets are still available.
  • 9/22/2018 Noblesville Schools announced on Tuesday that the district will host a “Hero Night” to honor the many community organizations, individuals and businesses who supported Noblesville Schools during the May 25 shooting at Noblesville West Middle School.
    The Hero Night event will be held Sept. 25 at 5 p.m. in conjunction with the Noblesville East/West football game at Beaver Materials Field in Noblesville.
    Hero honorees will enjoy free game admission, tailgate refreshments and a recognition program. The district is encouraging the general community to attend the game and celebrate the honorees.
  • Noblesville actress connects audiences with ‘Our Town’
    9/22/2018 Have you ever wondered how actors remember all of their lines? 
    How do they deliver flawlessly night after night? Does it get easier? Are there moments that their mind goes blank? Does a live audience make them nervous?
    As show producer of The Belfry Theatre’s “Our Town” drama, which is in its second weekend of an eight-show run, I had the opportunity on Friday morning to have a conversation with Noblesville’s Susan Hill. She plays the role of Stage Manager in the play, celebrating its 80th year and which continues through Sept. 30 at the Noblesville theater. Tickets are still available.
  • Hamilton Co. honored with statewide award for energy savings solar project
    9/22/2018 The Association of Indiana Counties’ awarded Hamilton County the “2018 County Achievement Award” on Wednesday for its Energy Savings Solar Project, which creates an estimated gross savings of $25 million on county government energy bills over the life of the contract.
    The project involved converting many of the county buildings from electric to gas heat as well as the installation of solar panels. The program utilizes the Guaranteed Energy Savings Contract process which is allowed by state law. This allows the county to receive rebates involving over-produced electricity from its energy provider over a 30-year span.
  • Huskies fall to Twin Lakes
    9/22/2018 The Hamilton Heights Huskies started off slow on Friday, but we’re able to come back and fight. 
    The first quarter was dominated by the Twin Lakes offense as they scored a touchdown taking an early lead. At the beginning of the second half the Indians were able to keep their lead until a personal foul allowed for a Husky touchdown making the score 7-20. 
    With their spirits high the Huskies were determined to gain the lead. Senior, Tad Defoe ran 63 yards on a kickoff half way through the second quarter, which set up junior Camron Knott’s first touchdown of the night.
  • Noblesville wins homecoming game
    9/22/2018 The spirit week festivities were over, the floats were unveiled, the parade had ended, and the Noblesville Millers got to the task at hand—getting a win against Franklin Central on homecoming night.
    The Millers took on the Franklin Central Flashes in Friday night’s homecoming matchup at Beaver Materials Field and the Millers took the win—10-0.
    Head coach Justin Roden said after the game that the win proves his team could be dangerous if they could clean up some of their mistakes—including costly penalties.
    “We would be scary if we ever played a clean football game,” Coach Roden said. “We could be really, really tough. If we could ever figure out how to play a clean football game, I mean, the potential here is unlimited.”
    Although he didn’t win homecoming king, senior Jack Knight was the standout of the night—scoring all 10 of Noblesville’s points, including a 35-yard fumble recovery and return for a touchdown.
  • 9/22/2018 The Fishers Tigers traveled to Avon to face the Orioles in another big HCC match-up. The Orioles received the opening kickoff and put together a long return into Tigers territory early in the game. The Fishers defense was up to the task and stopped the Orioles offense as Alex Lemaich had a couple huge tackles. The Tigers offense was not able to get anything going as they were forced to punt 3 times in the quarter. The Orioles converted after one of these punts. Avon was able to convert on a couple big 3rd downs and were aided by a controversial personal foul call before Sampson James scored from 2-yards out to give Avon an early 7-0 lead.
  • Kevin Dale Thompkins
    9/23/2018 Kevin Dale Thompkins, 55, Lebanon, passed away unexpectedly on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. He was born March 20, 1963, in Lebanon, the son of Charles Edward and Judy Rae Thompkins.
  • Mary Louise Walz
    9/21/2018 Mary Louise Walz, 82, of Arcadia, IN passed away Sept. 19, 2018 at I.U. Health Tipton Hospital. She was born Sept. 4, 1936 in Tipton, IN to John and Bertha (Friend) Pearson.
  • 9/21/2018 Frances Kay Jett, 68, of Noblesville, passed away on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018 at IU Health Saxony Fishers. She was born on Jan. 11, 1950 to Conrad and Geraldine Bettag in Indianapolis.
  • A Big Thank You
    9/14/2018 Dear Editor,
    A big thank you for the lovely gift of the piano I played for about 70 years for the Queen Contest.
    I really liked the piano and the beautiful girls and their apparel.
    Also, about three years ago, the 4-H Council awarded me a beautiful wristwatch, which I am enjoying.
    Thank you all very much and may God bless you all.
    -Phyllis E. Davis, Noblesville
  • 9/14/2018 As a Hoosier, I’m proud of the way Noblesville responded to its recent tragic school shooting. The response brought out the best in us, and it is worth noting, Mayor John Ditslear. My admiration and prayers go out to a brave teacher and a student who was truly an innocent victim.
    At the same time, I join other Hoosiers concerned that the Noblesville response to the Indiana Transportation Museum has brought out the worst in our legal system. Under the guise of environmental concern, the city has retained attorneys to figuratively “bleed the museum dry” with the excuse that they are merely paying more for a railyard clean-up at Forest Park. Countless other cities, including ours, have several environmental issues, but attempting to bankrupt a nonprofit organization is not the way to go about it.
  • 8/16/2018 Dear Editor,
    When it comes to vehicle safety, the brake system is at the top of the list. Brake Safety Awareness Month is the ideal time for drivers to stop and make sure their brakes are working properly before the new school year and colder temperatures arrive.
    Motorists can put a stop to any potential brake problems by recognizing the signs and symptoms that their brake system may need maintenance or repair. Typical warning signs include the car pulling to the left or right, noises when applying the brakes, an illuminated brake warning light, brake grabbing, low pedal feel, vibration, hard pedal feel and squealing. Several factors that affect brake wear include driving habits, vehicle type, operating conditions and the quality of the brake lining material.
    For routine maintenance, drivers should check their vehicle’s braking system at least once a year. A thorough inspection should include brake lining wear, brake fluid level, rotor thickness, condition of hoses and brake lines, brake and dash warning lights, as well as taking the car for a test drive to detect other potential brake system problems.
    Drivers should never put off routine brake inspections or any needed repair, such as letting the brakes get to the “metal-to-metal” point, which can be potentially dangerous and lead to a more costly repair bill.
  • Noblesville actress connects audiences with ‘Our Town’
    9/22/2018 Have you ever wondered how actors remember all of their lines? 
    How do they deliver flawlessly night after night? Does it get easier? Are there moments that their mind goes blank? Does a live audience make them nervous?
    As show producer of The Belfry Theatre’s “Our Town” drama, which is in its second weekend of an eight-show run, I had the opportunity on Friday morning to have a conversation with Noblesville’s Susan Hill. She plays the role of Stage Manager in the play, celebrating its 80th year and which continues through Sept. 30 at the Noblesville theater. Tickets are still available.
  • 9/22/2018 “What’s in here?” I asked Mary Ellen as I started to open still another carton the movers had deposited in the lower level of our new home.
    “What does it say on the box?” she asked.
    “It just says STUFF,” I said.
    “Well, that sounds like your kind of labeling system, Dick. A few years ago when we got new carpet, you did the packing alphabetically.  The cat ended up in the same box as the computer.”
    Before she finished her sentence, I realized this was not a box from our current move, but a box still unopened from two moves ago in 1985. I apparently hadn’t missed whatever was in it for almost 35 years. Anything called “stuff” couldn’t be that important, anyway.
  • 9/22/2018 Join us for the opening reception of "Stories of Gun Violence from Across America: Indianapolis" at Noblesville City Hall, Monday, September 24. This multimedia exhibit explores the stories of gun violence survivors, family members, and others who experience the "second hand smoke" of this American epidemic through honest storytelling and by bringing stories of trauma, grief, and strength to life - without agenda.  
        Did you read the last two words of this opening paragraph? Without agenda. Gun violence is a thing; it is real ya’all. At least two people I have invited to this opening have said some thing like, “I don’t believe in gun violence.” Or “Why do you want to take away our guns?” Oh my gosh! These photojournalist’s portraits are real, the commentary is in the photos, in the faces. Is it not possible to have a civil conversation around why we are experiencing gun violence in our schools, neighborhoods and cities? There are multilayered reasons for gun violence. There is not one answer, or simple understandings about this epidemic, but to just ignore it happens is just plain wrong. The sin of omission. In my opinion, this is another epidemic in our world today.
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


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This Week's Events

9/25/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
9/28/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.

Sunday, September 23, 2018

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