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The Times photo by Betsy Reason // Noblesville’s Larry Sweazy story, “The Prairie Fire,” is featured in a new anthology, “The Trading Post and Other Stories,” released today. He’ll autograph copies of the book and copies of his recently released, “See Also Proof,” during a book launch from noon to 4 p.m. June 30 at the Barnes and Noble in Noblesville
The Times photo by Betsy Reason // Noblesville’s Larry Sweazy story, “The Prairie Fire,” is featured in a new anthology, “The Trading Post and Other Stories,” released today. He’ll autograph copies of the book and copies of his recently released, “See Also Proof,” during a book launch from noon to 4 p.m. June 30 at the Barnes and Noble in Noblesville
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 4:00 AM

Larry Sweazy can’t sit and around and wait to be inspired.

Rather, the Noblesville author comes up with ideas and stories when he’s working on something else.

“I always have a deadline, since writing is my job,” said the freelance indexer and multiple award-winning author of mysteries, short stories and westerns.

His latest short story, “The Prairie Fire,” is featured in a new book, “The Trading Post and Other Stories,” released today. He’ll autograph copies of the book, and copies of his recently released, “See Also Proof,” during a book launch from noon to 4 p.m. June 30 at the Barnes and Noble in Noblesville.

The new book is an anthology of short stories set during the frontier. “I was happy to have a story included along with several of the top writers in the genre,” he said.

“The Prairie Fire” is his 31st short story that he has published in 25 years. The story is set in northern Hamilton County just after the signing of the Treaty of St. Mary’s in 1818. It’s a fictional story of two Miami Indian sisters who try to solve a murder, while their tribe is in a period of great turmoil. 

  • ‘Schism’ author, Heights grad plays host to author talk at Cicero library
    6/20/2018 

    Author Marc Mason shares his stories Saturday at 1 p.m. in the Hamilton North Public Library in Cicero. Young adults and adults are invited to visit with Mason and have books signed during the author talk.

    He also plans to talk about various creative outlets via digital technology that make it possible for anyone to accomplish their dreams. It’s important to Mason to encourage young people to pursue their creative interests and show them how easy it is to do.

    ?His books include "Schism: Out of the Shadows," "The Joker’s Advocate" and "You’ll Never Take Me Alive: Ruminations on Heroes and Villains," which are available for checkout from HNPL in Cicero. These books and others of his also may be purchased through online outlets and brick and mortar stores.

    A graduate of Hamilton Heights High School, Mason occasionally returns to the area to visit family and to do readings and signings. “I don't make it back there very often,” he said. “But when I do, I'm filled with a great fondness for the place where i grew up.”

  • Duke Energy, Hamilton County Parks join forces to improve Morse Park & Beach
    6/20/2018 

    More than 70 volunteers from Duke Energy joined with Hamilton County Parks and Recreation staff recently to make several improvements to Morse Park & Beach, as part of Duke Energy in Action -- a program that encourages employees to give back to their communities through various service opportunities.

    The park improvements included planting 20 trees, painting the bath house, shelters, maintenance building and softball diamond dugouts, installing 100-cubic yards of ADA approved engineered wood fiber in the playground area, installing 25-cubic yards of rock along the sea wall, cleaning up felled tree debris, and assembling 20 new picnic tables. In addition, volunteers helped with landscaping and general cleanup in and around the beach area to prepare for the season opening of the beach later that day.

    The project was made possible through funding and the hard work and dedication provided by Duke Energy and their many volunteers, in support of the Hamilton County Park staff.

     
  • A short story set in Noblesville
    6/20/2018 

    Larry Sweazy can’t sit and around and wait to be inspired.

    Rather, the Noblesville author comes up with ideas and stories when he’s working on something else.

    “I always have a deadline, since writing is my job,” said the freelance indexer and multiple award-winning author of mysteries, short stories and westerns.

    His latest short story, “The Prairie Fire,” is featured in a new book, “The Trading Post and Other Stories,” released today. He’ll autograph copies of the book, and copies of his recently released, “See Also Proof,” during a book launch from noon to 4 p.m. June 30 at the Barnes and Noble in Noblesville.

    The new book is an anthology of short stories set during the frontier. “I was happy to have a story included along with several of the top writers in the genre,” he said.

    “The Prairie Fire” is his 31st short story that he has published in 25 years. The story is set in northern Hamilton County just after the signing of the Treaty of St. Mary’s in 1818. It’s a fictional story of two Miami Indian sisters who try to solve a murder, while their tribe is in a period of great turmoil. 

  • 6/20/2018 Ty Gingerich made Guerin Catholic history at the IHSAA Golf State Finals June 13 and was one shot away from possibly putting his name on the tournament’s role of champions. 

    After shooting a frustrating 75 in the opening round, Gingerich found himself seven strokes off of the lead. An amazing second round score of 71 meant he finished as the leader in the clubhouse. Ultimately, his final tournament score of +2 was the best Finals score ever by a Golden Eagle and earned a three-way tie for third (one stroke off of the leaders).

    The tournament got underway the morning of June 12 at Carmel’s Prairie View Golf Club. Coming off of a Regional Championship, -6 round five days earlier, the opening round was a bit of a mixed bag for the junior.

    “I drove it pretty decent, but I wasn’t hitting iron shots all that great,” Gingerich said. “I struggled giving myself birdies, but I grinded out a lot of pars.”
  • Running for a special cause
    6/19/2018 Police officers and the Special Olympics go hand-in-hand – or should we say foot-by-foot. 

    For the 10th year, Hamilton County police officers participated in the annual “Torch Run” to raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics Indiana. This year’s run took place last Friday and helped raised money and awareness for the Special Olympics.

    “The thought was here to do something within Hamilton County where all of our police agencies could come together one particular day and show our support for (the Special Olympics),” said Lt. Bruce Barnes, Hamilton County Special Olympics Outreach coordinator and Noblesville Police Department’s public information officer. 

    The Torch Run consists of officers from various police agencies, such as Carmel, Fishers, Hamilton County Sheriff’s Department, Hamilton County Prosecutor’s Office, Indiana State Police, Noblesville and Westfield, to start at different points in the county based on their respective jurisdiction.
  • Notre Dame coach is keynote speaker at memorial golf tournament in Noblesville
    6/19/2018 Notre Dame men’s basketball head coach Mike Brey is the keynote speaker of the 16th Bryce Mitchell Memorial Golf Tournament Sunday. 

    The annual tournament is held to honor Bryce Mitchell, who died in an automobile accident that occurred as he was on his way to work with children at a basketball camp during the summer of 2002. The memorial fund continues to positively influence worthy and deserving people in need of assistance.

    Coach Brey will speak Sunday evening at Purgatory Golf Club, located at 12160 E. 216th St., Noblesville. The evening begins at 5 p.m. with social hour followed by dinner. Both a live and silent auction will take place, and Indiana Sports Talk host Bob Lovell will emcee the evening and make presentations of gifts to honorees. The following day, a full field of golfers will compete in the tournament, while CBS Sports 1430's Kent Sterling will be hosting his show from the golf club.
  • Sydney Marie Brotheridge
    6/20/2018 

    Sydney Marie Brotheridge, 22, passed away on June 9, 2018, in Tanzania, Africa.

    She was born on Dec. 28, 1995, to Eric Brotheridge and Maura Buck. 

  • Howard C. Campbell
    6/19/2018 

    Howard C. Campbell, 75, of Noblesville, went home to be with the Lord on Sunday, June 17, 2018, at Riverview Health.

    He was born Dec. 31, 1942, to Thomas and Ethel (Beam) Campbell in Easton, Pennsylvania.

  • Keith Allen Fiedler
    6/19/2018 Keith Allen Fiedler, 66, Noblesville, peacefully answered God’s call for an accomplished teacher and coach on June 9, 2018. 

    Mr. Fielder was born Oct. 19, 1951, the son of Kenneth Fiedler and Loretta Unsicker. 
  • 6/20/2018 Dear Editor, 

    Why do our young, male students want to harm their classmates?

    In every school shooting, it has been a young, white male who wants to harm his classmates. This is where the problem begins and we should be asking why. What is going on in the heads of these shooters that brings them to carry a gun or guns to school with the intention of harming other students and teachers?

    Are they being bullied and excluded by other students? Are they being overlooked by the teachers while in the classroom? Do they associate with other students who have the tendency of wanting to harm other students for whatever reason? What is their home life like? Do they come from a dysfunctional family or are growing up in a one parent family? 
  • 6/14/2018 Dear Editor, 

    I’ve been to the moon. I’ve been burned. But more often I’m honored. I’m your American flag.

    With 13 stars for colonies clamoring for freedom, I was first flown at Fort Stanwix in New York in 1777—and then carried into battle for the first time at Brandywine in Pennsylvania. By war’s end, I was saluted as the emblem of a sovereign nation, new and free. I’m your American flag.

    But challenges lay ahead. With 15 stars and 15 stripes, I survived shock and shell at Fort McHenry in 1814. With the aid of rockets’ red glare and bombs bursting in air, I was spied from afar at dawn’s early light by a patriot poet. I was then celebrated in sight and song by a fledgling nation. I’m your American flag.

    A half century later and with 33 stars and 13 stripes, I was saddened to see our nation divided. Our brothers’ blood was spilled in battle north and south. But by war’s end, Lincoln’s iconic words at Gettysburg prevailed—a unique nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. But that pledge was yet to be fully fulfilled.
  • 6/11/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    At 9:06 a.m. on May 25, an armed student entered my son’s classroom in Noblesville and opened fire.

    Amazingly, there were no fatalities.

    However, another student and my son were struck numerous times. Thankfully, both are recovering, but the injured student will have an extended hospital stay. Since that surreal day, there have been so many acts of kindness and so many notes of encouragement and prayers that I couldn’t possibly begin to thank everyone personally.

    Please accept the following thanks and know that every act, every word and every prayer has been deeply appreciated.

  • 6/17/2018 

    Barbecue season is in full swing and it’s a good time to review food safety. Food-borne illness is something that almost all of us have experienced at some point in our lives.

    Food-borne illness is defined as more than two people having a similar illness with evidence of food as the source. The overall rate of these illnesses has gone down drastically in the last century with improvements in food handling and sanitation. However, we still hear about illness outbreaks.

    There are approximately 76 million cases of food-related illness in the United States each year. There are also about 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Underdeveloped countries, as a group, experience about one billion cases annually and four to six million deaths.

  • 6/17/2018 Welcome back, summer! 

    Summer officially begins on Thursday, ushering in a number of events and activities for the whole family. With the warmer weather and longer days, now is the time to get out and explore everything Noblesville and the state offers. 

    Finding fun and exciting events and attractions in our community is easy, thanks to Visit Hamilton County. Whether traveling to Carmel, Fishers, Noblesville, Westfield or other nearby towns, information to plan your next adventure can be found at visithamiltoncounty.com. Connect with an online trip planner and travel guide, and find special offers for local getaways. 

    Each Thursday, the Noblesville Parks Department hosts free concerts from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Dillon Park. This Friday and then again on July 13, July 27, Aug. 10 and Aug. 24, enjoy Food Truck Friday at Federal Hill Commons. In July, we can look forward to Tenderloin Tuesday with deals on tenderloin sandwiches served at more than 30 local restaurants. 
  • 6/17/2018 

    At 3 a.m., in the absence of sleep, I have been lying here reading the Center for Human Rights website. Part of my sleeplessness is due to the fact that my ten and eleven-year-olds are with their dad for a month. In 26 years of being a mom, I can’t begin to add up the number of times I have awakened in the middle of the night, felt a pang of fear, and walked quietly from room to room to check on each of my sleeping children. Not having that ability is new to me.

    I wonder if they are also lying awake, wishing they could crawl into bed with me like they sometimes do. My youngest is prone to nightmares, and will often appear at my bedside, needing to be comforted. Is he having nightmares tonight? I try not to think about it.

    My point here is this...as difficult as it is for our family to experience the ramifications of divorce, I cannot imagine the emotional trauma inflicted on children separated from their parents and held in immigrant detention centers. How great is the fear of moms and dads who are unable to check on their kids at night? How could they even begin to sleep knowing their children are indefinitely in the hands of a government that seemingly hates them?

  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


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This Week's Events

6/17/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/18/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/20/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/21/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/23/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

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