Home | Contact Us | Facebook | Subscribe | Advertise
The Noblesville Times 24-7
Friday, April 20, 2018 10:49 AM
The Noblesville Main Street executive committee and its board of directors announced Thursday night the naming of Lorna Steele as the organization’s newest executive director. 

Steele joins Noblesville Main Street after most recently serving as assistant recreation director for the City of Noblesville Parks & Recreation department. 

“This role is so important for our thriving downtown, and also our community,” said Jackie Bell, vice president of the Noblesville Main Street Board of Directors. “Lorna is positioned to lead as we kick off our exciting season of events. Her passion for this community and this role, makes her a perfect match for the organization’s next growth chapter.” 
Chuck Goodrich
Chuck Goodrich State Representative District 29 People First
  • 4/20/2018 The Noblesville Main Street executive committee and its board of directors announced Thursday night the naming of Lorna Steele as the organization’s newest executive director. 

    Steele joins Noblesville Main Street after most recently serving as assistant recreation director for the City of Noblesville Parks & Recreation department. 

    “This role is so important for our thriving downtown, and also our community,” said Jackie Bell, vice president of the Noblesville Main Street Board of Directors. “Lorna is positioned to lead as we kick off our exciting season of events. Her passion for this community and this role, makes her a perfect match for the organization’s next growth chapter.” 
  • World’s rarest breed of goats born at Conner Prairie
    4/20/2018 The rarest breed of goats in the world have been born at Conner Prairie.

    Three Arapawa kids were born in late March to two Arapawa does through natural breeding. The new arrivals were about 5-7 pounds when born, said Conner Prairie Livestock Staff Interpreter Emily Nyman. They will nurse for about two months while their diet shifts to hay and grass.

    “As babies, they can double their weight every two weeks and mature around age 1,” Nyman said. “The breed is incredibly hardy and can survive harsh weather and poor growing conditions.”

    According to the Livestock Conservancy, the Arapawa goat derives from the extinct Olde English milch goat that would have been brought to the country by English settlers. Historic records show that goats of that breed were released in 1777 by European colonist Capt. James Cook on Arapawa Island, known today as Arapaoa Island, located off the northern tip of the South Island of New Zealand. They were left on the island as a future, renewable source of meat and milk for the area. Although they eventually went extinct in the U.S., the breed thrived on Arapawa Island.

    They were first imported to the U.S. in 1993.

    The Arapawa goat is critically close to extinction – it is estimated that there are fewer than 300 worldwide.
  • New Babyland sign highlights renovations at Riverside Cemetery
    4/20/2018 In the past year, several Noblesville departments have collaborated to renovate Riverside Cemetery. 

    Located in Downtown Noblesville along the banks of the White River, the earliest known burial marker at Riverside Cemetery is dated 1824. The cemetery, which is available to all regardless of race, creed or ethnic heritage, is maintained by the Noblesville Street Department and overseen by the City Clerk and Board of Works.

    “An important function of the city is the preservation of Noblesville’s history,” Noblesville Clerk Evelyn Lees said. “And with the help of many people, we are making good progress at Riverside Cemetery,”

    In the fall, work was done to distinguish Babyland’s portion of the cemetery. Babyland was established and used in the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s. Nineteen infants are buried there, however, only six graves are marked. A new metal sign was designed and created by Rick Heflin of RC Metalworks in Downtown Noblesville to incorporate the names and years of those burials located in Babyland.

    “Fewer and fewer people knew the boundaries,” Lees said. “So we felt it was important to mark off the area.” 
  • OUT IN THE OPEN - Verde Canyon Railroad: Desert Delight
    4/20/2018 As a writer, you seek out superlatives, and I recently found one: the best four-hour railroad excursion in America.

    For those readers who didn’t catch the last column, it covered our recent dusty explorations in the desert around Prescott, Arizona. Of the numerous adventures described, we saved the best day trip for last: the Verde Canyon Railroad (VCRR).

    The VCRR is a tourist railroad that runs from the town of Clarkdale into the namesake Verde River canyon. Accessible only by rail, the canyon is a scenic wonder that offers stunning vistas, history and wildlife at every turn, and you see it all from either an air-conditioned Pullman coach or open-air cars. Riding those open-air cars through the awe-inspiring landscape is one of the most immersive, satisfying experiences you’ll ever have. 

    But first, let’s back up.

    Depending on your route of travel, you might go through the town of Jerome, Arizona. Having traveled mountainous areas across the U.S., I have to say that Jerome wins hands-down for the most unusual and death-defying city in America.
  • Westfield senior reflects on no-hitter against Noblesville
    4/19/2018 After striking out the final batter in a 3-0 victory over Noblesville on Friday, Westfield’s Matthew Meyer was finally able to crack a smile.

    Throughout the contest, the senior pitcher sat in the back of the dugout, away from his teammates who cheered along the rest of the Shamrocks team. He knew he was on the verge of throwing a no-hitter, but didn't want to think about it too much.

    That seventh-inning strikeout gave him his first victory of the season and completed a 103-pitch no-hitter for Meyer. He finished the day with 10 strikeouts and four walks in his seven innings of work.

    “The whole last inning, I was still pretty calm and relaxed,” Meyer said. “Once I struck out that last batter, I realized what happened, and I saw my teammates running at me. It was pretty sweet … Honestly, it’s something I’ve never really experienced before.”
  • Student-Athlete Tip of the Week
    4/17/2018 With the end of the school year only five or six weeks away, all student-athletes should be thinking about finishing strong in the classroom.

    This time of year it is so easy to look ahead to summer. However, don't forget about the importance of your grades. The last weeks of school are just as important as the first few, so don't let your grade-point average slip. Think of the end of the school year like it's the end of a ballgame. Don't let all the hard work disappear in a one or two week period.

    Whether you play a spring sport or not, the next few weeks could determine a college choice down the road. Don't look back next year (whether you are a senior or underclassman) and say, “If my grades were better last year, I could be attending the college of my choice.” 
  • Michael Owen Robertson
    4/19/2018 Michael Owen Robertson, 62, of Kokomo, passed away on Tuesday, April 17, 2018, at his home. 

    He was born on Dec. 26, 1955, to Larry and Mary (Harold) Robertson in Indianapolis.
  • Mary Myrna Beck
    4/19/2018 Mary Myrna Beck, 91, passed away on April 17, 2018, at the Otterbein Franklin Senior Life Community in Franklin, Indiana. 

    Mrs. Beck was born on April 20, 1926, the second child of Harry and Alice (Davis) Kidd. 
  • Brandon Tyler Fox
    4/19/2018 Brandon Tyler Fox, 27, of Fishers, passed away on Tuesday, April 10, 2018, in Santa Ana, California. 

    He was born on June 2, 1990, in Beech Grove, Indiana. 
  • 4/19/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    There has been many reports about the poor condition of Indianapolis roads now that winter is finally wrapping up. However, it's not just Indianapolis.

    Interstates and highways in and around Indianapolis, which are under the jurisdiction of the Indiana Department of Transportation, are just as bad. Hitting a pothole at 45 miles per hour or faster can be devastating. 

    I can think of at least five people off the top of my head who have required tire repairs due to hitting potholes in and around Indianapolis city streets and highways. I myself recently had to, as well.

    I report as many potholes as I can using the Indianapolis Mayor's Action Center RequestIndy app, but the Indiana Department of Transportation’s website simply has a webform to fill out. There's no way to check the progress of your report or find out if INDOT is doing anything about it, other than to wait and see if the pothole you reported is going to get fixed.

     
  • 4/19/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    The elected sheriff assumes three core job duties when taking office:

    • Provide law enforcement protection for the unincorporated population of the county and assist, when needed, those municipal and town police departments protecting the incorporated population.
    • Operate and maintain the County Jail and Juvenile Detention Center.
    • Serve and protect the seven state courts housed in the Government and Judicial Center.

    The sheriff’s operating budget is $17.3 million, which includes 216 personnel and a fleet of more than 100 vehicles. The staff consists of 61 sworn police officers, 131 staff assigned to the corrections operation and 24 civilian staff.

    The next sheriff will face many challenges:

     
    • 4/17/2018 Dear Editor, 

      The front page announcement with picture on April 10 that our leaders approved and gladly announced with a ceremony the building of more jail cells was a sad sight to me.

      Do we need more jail space? What is causing this agreed upon need?

      We have 5 percent of the world’s population and 20 percent of its jail population. What is wrong with this picture?

      Are our fellow citizens more uncivilized than the world's average person? Are our neighbors’ behaviors really so unacceptable that we need to take them from their families and jobs to lock them away?
    • A ‘Hero’ to kids, Club and her family
      4/20/2018 Growing up, Abigail Stutesman-Rinehart lived only a three-minute bicycle ride, or a 15-minute walk, from the Boys & Girls Club of Noblesville.

      Her younger brother, Josh, and older sister, Amanda, went there to play sports. She didn’t play sports, but she joined the Club because there was always something to do there. Super Saturdays, cooking classes, overnight slumber parties. It was the special events and the recreation and the arts and crafts that attracted her to the Club.

      “My dad was huge in the Boys & Girls Club, as far as volunteering,” often refereeing athletic events, said the 39-year-old, a 1996 graduate of Noblesville High School, who has served the Boys & Girls Club for the past 18 years and is currently the Club’s unit director. 

      She is among 100 Heroes being honored today during “A Future United -- United Way of Central Indiana’s 100th Anniversary” at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The 100 Heroes will ride in a Pace Car parade along with Gov. Eric Holcomb, NCAA legend and original Indiana Pacer grand marshal Jerry Harkness and United Way officials.

      The Club’s executive director, Becky Terry, nominated Stutesman-Rinehart for the honor.

      “Throughout her years of service and her interactions with children and their families, she has impacted many lives,” Terry said “… One thing has never changed, her passion and focus on the youth, their needs and their development.”
    • 4/20/2018 I’ve seen some odd things in the old newspapers, but I’ve never encountered anything quite like the minutes of the Federal Hill Twilight Club.

      When I initially stumbled across the club, I couldn’t tell if it was real or if my leg was being pulled, so I poked around the internet and discovered there were actually several “Twilight Clubs” around the country during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

      The first of these was established in New York City in the early 1880s as a social/dinner club where a wide variety of topics were discussed. Basically, any subject matter was fair game.

      The other clubs seem to have been modeled after that one, but apparently had no connection to it, or to each other.

      To be honest, I’m still not 100 percent sure the Federal Hill Twilight Club was a real organization. However, I did find other references to it besides their minutes, like an item in a 1903 Hamilton County Ledger, which noted the group had acquired new quarters over a cigar store on the square and had made plans to incorporate.

      If this organization did indeed exist, it certainly took the idea of intellectual discussion to a whole different level, though.
    • Noblesville’s new hotel ready for 1st guests
      4/17/2018 

      Noblesville’s new Embassy Suites Hotel & Conference Center is awaiting its first guest.

      The city’s newest, largest and most impressive hotel opens today.

      “We are still awaiting for the magic moment when we get approval to open the reservation booking tool so our first guest can arrive,” said Kelly Sujka of Noblesville, the hotel’s director of sales.

      She said while there has been much excitement about today’s opening of the hotel for accommodations, “Unfortunately our reservations system will not allow us to book for opening night until the magic moment that our brand Hilton quality inspector arrives and ensures that we have met the guidelines established by Embassy Suites to meet the needs of our guests ... My guess is later in the afternoon.”

      I had the awesome opportunity to tour the hotel with front office manager Ashley Lawson on Thursday, when I attended the Noblesville Chamber of Commerce’s Taste of Business there.

      “We already have over a million dollars on the books,” Lawson told me. “So, we’re off to a great start.”

    • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

      The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

      The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
      The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

      Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


       


    Chuck Goodrich
    Chuck Goodrich State Representative District 29 People First

    Events_Calendar

    "Select a day to show the events for that day below the heading "This week's events"
    Calendar
    Title and navigation
    Title and navigation
    Move back 3 monthsMove back 1 month

    April 2018

    Move forward 1 monthMove forward 3 months

    April 2018

    SMTWTFS
           
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    2930     

    This Week's Events

    4/15/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/16/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/17/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/17/2018
    Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
    4/18/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/19/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/20/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/20/2018
    Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
    4/21/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

    Saturday, April 21, 2018

    Site Search

    GO


    Our app is now available!

         
        



    © 2018 The Times
    a division of Sagamore News Media
    920 S. Logan St, Suite 101 Noblesville, IN 46060

    (317) 770-7777

    life

    Software © 1998-2018 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved