Home | Contact Us | Facebook | Subscribe | Advertise
The Noblesville Times 24-7
The Times photo by Betsy Reason
John Carpenter and his kids, Kaia and Caden, enjoy his grandpa's 90-year-old Flexible Flyer sled on Saturday afternoon at Forest Park sledding hill.
The Times photo by Betsy Reason John Carpenter and his kids, Kaia and Caden, enjoy his grandpa's 90-year-old Flexible Flyer sled on Saturday afternoon at Forest Park sledding hill.
Monday, January 14, 2019 4:00 AM
When we got up Saturday morning and saw the beautiful white snow on the ground, we knew that it would be a great day to head for Forest Park sledding hill.
It’s the best place in Noblesville to take your sled that we’ve found.
Our neighbors, Emily and William Dilts, said there were only a few on the hill when they took their 4-year-old son, Bobby, earlier that morning. We saw their great video of Bobby sledding down the hill.
When we arrived at 2:30 p.m., we found more sledders than we’ve ever seen on the hill.
  • FOP endorses Chris Jensen for Noblesville mayor
    1/14/2019 Today, the Noblesville Fraternal Order of Police Officers Lodge #198 announced their endorsement of Chris Jensen for Mayor of Noblesville via press release.
    “Lodge #198, after careful and deliberate consideration, officially announces its support and endorsement of Noblesville Mayoral candidate Chris Jensen,” the FOP said in their statement. “We share in his visions for this community and look forward to working with him, in partnership, to continue providing high-quality, professional, and efficient public safety services to the citizens of Noblesville.”
  • 1/14/2019 The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration announced last week that the Office of Early Childhood and Out-of-School Learning received nearly $7 million in federal grant funding to strengthen the state’s early childhood education system.
    The grant supports strategic planning and a formal evaluation of Indiana’s birth-through-age-5 early childhood education programs.
    The preschool development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will help ensure early education is streamlined to best serve Hoosier families and meet Indiana’s workforce needs. Grant outcomes will help further inform and develop Gov. Holcomb’s Next Level agenda goal to expand On My Way Pre-K in 2021.
  • 1/14/2019 The award-winning City Government Academy returns this spring offering Fishers residents an inside look at their local government and community.
    The ten-week program, taking place Wednesday, Feb. 13, through Tuesday, April 16, allows residents to connect with City leaders, earn a greater understanding of day-to-day operations, and get an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at Fishers’ unique facilities and departments, including stormwater, the fire and police departments, parks, and more.
    Registration is free for Fishers residents ages 18 and older and due Thursday, Feb. 7. A complete spring schedule is also available.
    Special accommodations, such as ASL interpreters, can be arranged for this program.
  • Noblesville’s matchup against Fort Wayne Northrup canceled due to bad weather
    1/13/2019 The Noblesville Millers’ varsity basketball team (7-7) was hoping to bounce back with a win on Saturday night against Fort Wayne Northrup after a tough loss to seventh-ranked Zionsville on Friday night at The Mill in Noblesville.
    Unfortunately for the Millers, this past weekend’s winter storm kept them from taking the trip to Fort Wayne on Saturday night.
    Noblesville hopes to notch a win in their next game to keep themselves above .500. Based on the scheduled, the Millers should be able to do just that.
    The Millers are set to take on the Franklin Central Flashes (1-11) in an away game on Friday, Jan. 18, at Franklin Central High School. Tip-off is set for 7:30 p.m.
  • Millers fall to seventh-ranked Eagles in tight game
    1/12/2019 The Millers (7-7) took on the seventh-ranked Zionsville Eagles (11-3) on Friday night in a conference matchup at The Mill in Noblesville.
    The Millers kept their hopes alive until the final seconds of the game, but were eventually defeated 59-57. The loss marked the Millers’ third loss in conference play this season.
    Noblesville’s Xavier Hines led the Millers in scoring with 21-points on 10 attempts. Hines also finished the game with two assists, a block and a steal. Zach Johnson and Alex Hunt each added 12 points of their own.
  • 1/9/2019 The Noblesville swimmers and divers competed in a double dual meet Tuesday against North Central and University High School at North Central. Noblesville's boys’ team defeated both teams; the Miller girls defeated University but lost to NC. Individual event winners for the Miller Wolfpack were: Sammy Huff in the 200 free and 100 breast; Caitlin Marshall in the 200 IM and 100 fly; Stephan Isaac in the 200 IM and 100 breast; Jack Wolfred in the 50 and 100 free; Jared Newman in diving, and Cam Kramer in the 100 back. Noblesville will travel to Zionsville on Thursday.
  • Crosley Jayne Buchner
    1/15/2019 Crosley Jayne Buchner, age 7, of Noblesville, passed away on Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019 at Peyton Manning Children's Hospital at St. Vincent in Indianapolis. She was born on Aug. 15, 2011 to Scott and Emilie (Feick) Buchner in Carmel, Ind.
  • Carolyn Nell Hagerty Heier
    1/15/2019 Carolyn Nell Hagerty Heier, 75, a child of God, and formerly of New Castle and Noblesville, died peacefully in Orlando, Fla. on Jan. 7, 2019. She was born to Pauline Eza Loveday Hagerty and Lloyd Eldon Hagerty in Alcoa, Tenn. on June 27, 1943.
  • Jacob Michael "Jake" Lucas
    1/15/2019 Jacob Michael "Jake" Lucas, of Noblesville, 25, passed away on Sunday, Jan. 13, 2019. He was born on Feb. 4, 1993 in Noblesville.
  • 1/11/2019 Dear Editor,
    I have read with interest the letters recently published regarding the use of tax abatements to encourage economic development. As Councilmen O’Connor and Peterson elaborated, new or expanding businesses may ultimately increase the tax base and those business owners have developed an expectation of support for their projects. There are certainly circumstances when the use of tax abatements or tax increment financing (TIF) are appropriate. The question that must be decided by an administration and/or a city council considering the request for such support is what are the benefits to the city in increased jobs, increased tax base, or in addressing a need identified before the request was made.
  • 1/3/2019 Editor:
    I’m spending a lot of time at City Council meetings these days trying to understand the reasons behind their decisions. A couple of weeks ago, just before Christmas, the council made three decisions on an issue that continues to confound me. Why do we repeatedly give tax breaks to area businesses when they decide to move, build or expand here? This letter is about tax abatements and I know tax policy can make peoples’ eyes glaze over but stick with me because I think this issue hits all of us in the pocketbook.
  • 12/28/2018 Hamilton County and the cities within it, are named time and time again ‘Best Place to Live’ and ‘Safest City.’ If there were a title for ‘Most Giving’ or ‘Helping People in Need,’ I believe we should strive to snag those titles also. My point is: we are blessed and lucky to have so many people that dedicate their lives to helping those with serious need in Hamilton County. 
    If you’re stumped by how to get started, find your passion, and what really touches you at a meaningful level. There is likely a group (non-profit, etc) that can help match your gifts with those in need. A great example, for me, is The Good Samaritan Network (GSN), run by Nancy Chance, and an large network of tireless volunteers.
  • Enjoying a weekend of sledding at Forest Park
    1/14/2019 When we got up Saturday morning and saw the beautiful white snow on the ground, we knew that it would be a great day to head for Forest Park sledding hill.
    It’s the best place in Noblesville to take your sled that we’ve found.
    Our neighbors, Emily and William Dilts, said there were only a few on the hill when they took their 4-year-old son, Bobby, earlier that morning. We saw their great video of Bobby sledding down the hill.
    When we arrived at 2:30 p.m., we found more sledders than we’ve ever seen on the hill.
  • 1/14/2019 Sometimes I get asked questions in unusual places. A few months ago at church I was pulled aside and asked if I could write my column on that menopausal malady – hot flashes.
  • 1/12/2019 When I attended seminary, as a new student, I was given a glossary of words that are commonly used in religious circles, specifically for theology students. It was not just subject matter, I needed to worry about, and I also needed to learn a new language.
    Words such as Transubstantiation, Soteriology. Justification. Sanctification. Pneumatology, Ecclesiology, Narthex, Hermeneutics, Eschatology, Sacristy, Lectionary, and many others, tried to get the best of me. They all seemed Greek to me. (That’s a seminarian joke.) Back in the day, we also were required to take Greek and Hebrew. Kids have it easy these days. If you are a Lutheran seminarian (student) you are still required to take two languages, but they can be sign language or Spanish.
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


Events_Calendar

"Select a day to show the events for that day below the heading "This week's events"
Calendar
Title and navigation
Title and navigation
Move back 3 monthsMove back 1 month

January 2019

Move forward 1 monthMove forward 3 months

January 2019

SMTWTFS
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
       

This Week's Events

1/15/2019
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
1/17/2019
Three new films about the White River—and the lives it touches—will premiere at a free launch party in Noblesville. Indiana Humanities, in partnership with Hamilton County Tourism, will screen the films and hold a Q&A with the Indiana-based filmmakers. Attendees can enjoy snacks and beers compliments of Upland Brewing. Through the films, viewers will meet volunteers, artists, activists, farmers, engineers, developers, city officials, hikers and parents. They’ll paddle downstream with Friends of the White River, explore the Dig Indy tunnel, and soar overhead with the great blue herons of our region. The films are each between 11 and 15 minutes in length. A trailer is available to watch at www.IndianaHumanities.org/CampfiresFilms. Over the last year, Indiana Humanities focused its Next Indiana Campfires program on the White River watershed and the larger question of how Hoosiers relate to water and to each other across watersheds. To explore these connections further—and to document a particularly exciting moment for Indiana waterways—Indiana Humanities selected local filmmakers to create three short films about the White River. The films and filmmakers follow. • Braided with the Current by Katelyn Calhoun and Hannah Hodges: Katelyn Calhoun has spent the past five years in Indianapolis creating documentary content. She is currently in pre-production for an Appalachian Trail short documentary, (Tr)alias. Hannah Hodges co-founded and runs Hodges Marketing Solutions, a digital marketing agency, with her husband Mark. She is involved in the Indianapolis film community and has a variety of experience ranging from work on documentaries and narrative shorts to corporate videos and live events. Most of her favorite moments, both personally and professionally, occur outside enjoying nature. • Onward Ever: The Becoming of Indiana’s White River by Brandon Walsh: Brandon Walsh is an Indy-based video producer. His narrative short films have screened at a number of festivals across the Midwest, and he has made national award-winning commercial work with the advertising agency CVR. • White River: Perspectives by Hannah Lindgren: Hannah Lindgren is a visual storyteller who works for The Story Shop in Pendleton and hails from the northeast side of Indianapolis. She specializes in telling the stories of nonprofits, causes, small businesses and communities through short videos. This is her fourth documentary film.
1/18/2019
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Site Search

GO


Our app is now available!

     
    



© 2019 The Times
a division of Sagamore News Media
920 S. Logan St, Suite 101 Noblesville, IN 46060

(317) 770-7777

life

Software © 1998-2019 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved