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Polkaboy, will perform the popular series’ season-launching concert in Cool Creek Park
Photo provided Polkaboy, will perform the popular series’ season-launching concert in Cool Creek Park
Friday, May 24, 2019 3:18 AM
On Friday, June 14, the eccentrically talented troupe, Polkaboy, will perform the popular series’ season-launching concert in Cool Creek Park. The summer concert series, presented by Hamilton County Parks, and title sponsored by Clay Township Trustee Office and Board, was first staged in the park in 1994. Many of the performers slated to appear this season, have played a role in contributing to the popularity of the historic series – including headliners like Jennie DeVoe, The Flying Toasters and Duke Tumatoe and the Power Trio.
In celebration of the concerts’ 25-year milestone, crazy fun activities ranging from a huge inflatable Wipe Out challenge ring to a zany Velcro wall have been planned. Visits from the Pacer Fan Van and added performances by Bach to Rock’s talented musical protégés will also be offered to concert-goers. And for the series’ opening concert, the park department is planning a very exciting anniversary surprise to delight music fans. Watch for details related to that surprise to be announced soon.
  • Hamilton Heights announces new student workforce program
    5/25/2019 ARCADIA – Hamilton Heights High School has begun implementing a program that is said to be a first of its kind in the state.
    Representatives from the school and other organizations announced details about the State Earn and Learn (SEAL) program this week.
    "For years, young people have been made believe that there is one path to success and that path is the same for all regardless of what students wanted to do in their future," said Carrie Lively, senior director of the Office of Work-Based Learning and Apprenticeship, which, along with the Indiana Construction Roundtable Foundation, is partnering with the school on the program.
    The SEAL program is a way for high school students to take on construction apprenticeships for high school credit. They also get paid for the work they do, creating connections between students and possible employers in the workforce.
    Eric Fisher, industrial tech and National Center for Construction Education and Research teacher at Hamilton Heights High School, said there usually isn't a monetary reward with internship programs similar to the SEAL program.
    "This is going to be a way to connect kids to the employers, and while they're working as an apprentice they will also be able to earn a wage," Fisher said.
  • Noblesville resident selected ambassador
    5/25/2019 Christopher Lingren of Noblesville was selected from hundreds of applicants to attend the sixth annual Global Travel Marketplace West as an Ambassador at the Westin Lake Las Vegas Resort & Spa in Las Vegas earlier this month.
    GTM is a multi-day, appointment-only event for top producing travel advisors in North America and leading cruise, hotel, tour and destination suppliers seeking to conduct business face-to-face. Only a select group of the nearly 800 applicants were chosen to participate, and only 20 percent were invited back as Ambassadors.
  • 5/24/2019 June has been designated as Wine Grape Month in Indiana, and the wine industry will team up with another signature state event, the Indianapolis 500, to kick off the month.
    An "Explore Indiana Wines" float will be among those in the 500 Festival Parade, which begins at 11:45 a.m. on Saturday (May 25) in downtown Indianapolis. The exploration of Indiana's wineries and vineyards continues on June 1 with the 20th annual Vintage Indiana Festival, which will run from noon to 6 p.m. at Military Park in downtown Indianapolis.
    "The monthlong celebration is to make consumers aware of Indiana's vibrant wine industry and encourage them to sample Hoosier wines and visit some of the state's many wineries and vineyards," said Katie Barnett, marketing Extension specialist for Purdue's Wine Grape Team. "Summer is a prime time for vacations and weekend trips, and wineries will have events throughout the summer and special deals during Wine Grape Month. As an added bonus, over the next few weeks the vineyards should be in full bloom."
  • 5/24/2019 Numerous Hamilton County track and field boys will be advancing to state after their performance at the regional Thursday evening at Lafayette Jefferson High School.
    Fishers will have five boys in total advancing. The Tigers also placed first overall in at the event. The team of H.L Lewis, Ethan Ethan Meyer, Jaylen Castillo and Keefer Soehngen placed first in the 4X400 with a time of 3:19.91. Hayden Tobias will be joining them at state as he also placed first in the shotput with a total distance of 57 ft. and one half inches. 
  • 5/24/2019 Conor Daly’s chance is now.

    The Noblesville native starts 11th in Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 and his No. 25 U.S. Air Force Honda is the best ride he’s had in the Memorial Day weekend classic but adversity helped mold him.

    Last year, Daly made a late run on Bump Day to qualify for the 500 in a car built from a combined effort of two different teams and Daly started 33rd out of 33 cars, finishing 21st . This year, he’s racing for the team that’s won three of the last five Indianapolis 500s with two teammates that have won the race.
  • 5/24/2019 Here is your daily roundup on everything that happened today in the world of Hamilton County Sports!
  • Johnetta L. Pharris
    5/24/2019 Johnetta L. Pharris, 34 of Noblesville, passed away on Wednesday, May 22, 2019 in her home. 
    Born February 8, 1985 in Indianapolis, she was the daughter of John and Glenda [Newby] Pharris.
  • 5/24/2019 Nedra Jean (Woodworth) Holloway, 75, of Westfield, passed away peacefully at home on Tuesday January 15, 2019. She was a 25-year breast cancer survivor, a 6-year heart transplant survivor, but succumbed to lung cancer after a two year battle. She was born on September 13, 1943 to Stanley and Patricia Woodworth in Noblesville, Indiana.
  • Gulshan Saeed
    5/22/2019 Gulshan Saeed, 74, of Noblesville, passed away on Sunday, May 19, 2019 at St. Vincent Heart Center Indianapolis. He was born on Oct. 15, 1944 in Pakistan.
  • 5/8/2019 Dear Editor,
    As a former US Marine Veteran and FBI Special Agent for 28 years and Father of 4 children, all Purdue Graduates, I have witnessed great sacrifice and dedication by Federal Employee.
    Federal employees serve and protect us every day at every level across the country and in our community. At no time was this more evident than during the 35-day partial government shutdown earlier this year. 
    From ensuring safe air travel to regulating new medicines to maintaining a safe food supply to processing Social Security checks, civil servants are everywhere, yet invisibly so. And, contrary to popular belief, 85 percent of the federal workforce is located outside of Washington, DC. 
    When natural disasters strike, they provide relief and help us rebuild. When mass shootings take place, they enter harm's way and care for the wounded. And, when once-eradicated viruses reappear, they investigate public health crises. Whether they are in the public eye or active behind the scenes, civil servants take pride in working for something bigger than themselves. 
  • 5/8/2019 Dear Editor,
    Writer Ginger Claremohr wrote an excellent article “To vaccinate or not to vaccinate” depicting the situation of parents today when it comes to their children’s future health by vaccinating. It seems the medical industry tries to make children more perfect by creating vaccinations to add to their bodies.
    My grandfather who was born in the 1880’s said the less you inject into your body the healthier you will be. There are 70 doses of 16 vaccinations imposed on our children today. As a child I had only two vaccinations; the polio vaccine and the small pox. My generation became naturally immune to all childhood diseases by either being exposed or enduring the disease. This natural immunity is with my generation today and I believe we should go back to natural immunity for all children.
  • 5/4/2019 This is an exciting time for our community. For the first time in a generation, we have an open contest for mayor — no incumbent, no presumptive heir, just four candidates who have submitted their applications for this position. And now it is time for the citizens of Noblesville to decide who to hire as the next mayor to serve our city. I believe my proven leadership and experience make me the right leader — the right woman — at the right time for Noblesville. 
    First, as mayor, I will respect yesterday. I grew up two blocks from the square. Nothing says home to me more than walking south on 9th Street to the square. However, the square of today is not the same as when I sold Girl Scout cookies or delivered newspapers, and we can’t, and don’t, want to wrap it in shrink wrap. But we do need to ensure as things evolve around our authentic historic square that we don’t detract from the embodiment of our hometown values that draws people to our community.
  • 5/25/2019 This weekend is the unofficial beginning of summer. I can proudly wear my white pumps and carry my straw purse, no one will claim that I am a fashion malefactor. This past week, I dug out my Chico’s white Traveler pants to wear to an outdoor event, but I was very aware of my shoe choice and I wore my black strappy sandals, lest my grandmother roll over in her grave. If you are not aware of the wearing of white rule, let me fill you in. Between Memorial Day and Labor Day, it is perfectly acceptable and encouraged to wear white shoes, and carry a white purse. Woe to the gals who wear their whites during the fall and winter months, according to my mother; it is simply faux pas. This holiday weekend is not simply a marker for what to wear, or what not to wear. It is not only race weekend, the end of the school year, or the opening of the neighborhood swimming pools. It is a weekend that we honor those who have given their lives while serving in our Military. This weekend is also known as Decoration Day, the day many of us make the rounds to cemeteries. Each year, my in-laws dutifully drove from cemetery to cemetery delivering flowers and flags to family member who had died. It took them the whole day wandering Indiana delivering the goods, reminiscing the stories shared while giving honor to their lives.
    Twenty-five years ago, I was widowed with a baby and two children of school age. Each year, in May, my children and I make time to visit the cemetery and the gravestone of David, to sweep away the debris, clean the headstone and place new flowers in the urns. I have always loved cemeteries, especially in late May. Walking through the peace filled place where bodies lay, put to rest; it is truly sacred ground. A cemetery is filled with stories, genres of all kinds, monuments, unmarked graves, baby land, large crypts, benches, and the military section are part of the swath of ground that reminds us of our past as a community and as a family. 
  • A day we will never forget
    5/25/2019 It’s a day that we will never forget. May 25, 2018.
    Today is the one-year anniversary of the Noblesville West Middle School shooting that changed many of our lives. 
    A seventh-grader, armed with two handguns, opened gunfire in his classroom, injuring a science teacher and a fellow classmate. Thankfully, both the teacher Jason Seaman and the now NWMS eighth-grader Ella Whistler -- who was shot seven times and sustained injuries to her face, neck, hand and upper chest -- both survived.
    The unthinkable tragedy left a community saddened but stronger as we picked up the pieces.
    For days, weeks and months, we have been processing it all. Asking ourselves why and how it happened. How we somehow missed the signs. Or saw the signs but didn’t pay attention.
    We’ve read every spoken and written word by the media, trying to understand and wrap our head around it.
    But yet we still don’t really understand.
    As parents, we hope and pray that we bring our kids up right. That they are kind, responsible, motivated and set high standards in their lives. And that when we explain to our kids the value of life, they get it.
  • Memorial Day services will miss 3 of our WWII veterans
    5/24/2019 This Memorial Day will be the first time in 50 years that we will not have Noblesville veterans Bob Arbuckle, Howard Kenley Jr. and Stanley Robinson in attendance for services.
    “Three members of the Greatest Generation (were) called home to serve the Supreme Commander of us all. Their presence will be missed,” said Lynn Epperson, Hamilton County Veterans Services officer, who brings their passing to light in remembrance.
    Arbuckle died on Jan. 28, 2019, at age 96. He served in the military during World War II, enlisting in the U.S. Navy in Chicago in 1942, serving in Cuba, operating against the submarines, in the submarine detection corps. The Navy then sent him to officer training school, and he rose to lieutenant. He served on the U.S.S. South Dakota “a big battleship with 2,000 men on board.”
    “I’ve been in the Navy, active and reserve, every since then,” Arbuckle would say, still wearing his Navy uniform and showing off his Navy sword at the 2018 Memorial Day ceremony.
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


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This Week's Events

5/28/2019
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
5/31/2019
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
5/31/2019
En Pointe Indiana Ballet presents the delightful romantic comedy ballet that will sure to entertain the whole family. Let us inspire you as we follow Don Quixote into an imaginary world. Don Quixote is a fun-filled ballet with a charming cast of characters and lively dancing. Based on the book by Cervantes, this classic ballet follows Don Quixote and his squire, Sancho Panza, as they travel to save his imaginary lady Dulcinea. The colorful duo follows a journey that leads them to meet young lovers Kitri and Basilio. Along the way they encounter villagers, bull fighters, gypsies, cupids, dryads and, of course, a treacherous windmill. Love wins in the end and the village celebrates the wedding of Kitri and Basilio as Don Quixote and Sancho Panza continue their travels. Tickets are available at https://enpointe.yapsody.com/event/index/382891/don-quixote

Monday, May 27, 2019

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