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Photo provided // SWEET RIDE: Noblesville outfielder Bryce Randolph in his grandfather's Mercedes that he took to Noblesville High School Prom April 20. Randolph, who started the season in a 2-22 slump at the plate, has hit .447 since he borrowed the Mercedes.
Photo provided // SWEET RIDE: Noblesville outfielder Bryce Randolph in his grandfather's Mercedes that he took to Noblesville High School Prom April 20. Randolph, who started the season in a 2-22 slump at the plate, has hit .447 since he borrowed the Mercedes.
Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:26 PM

Noblesville senior Bryce Randolph began his season in a 2-for-22 slump at the plate. The outfielder wasn’t too thrilled with his contributions on the diamond.

His first thought was to set up a meeting with his personal hitting coach, Ryan Basham, in the second week of April to work out some of the kinks in his swing.

But then, the Noblesville High School Prom came around, and he wanted a special ride for the big dance. So he turned to one man he knew wouldn’t let him down – his maternal grandfather, “Papaw” Bill Peevler. Randolph asked his papaw if he could borrow his Mercedes, a hardtop convertible. The answer was, “Yes.”

  • Noblesville Schools, Parks partner on Back to School BASH
    5/23/2018 Noblesville Schools and the Noblesville Parks Department announced today they will be jointly hosting the 2018 Back to School BASH at Federal Hill Commons July 27 from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 

    The event features food, games, athletics, arts, music and community youth organizations and typically draws about 5,000 attendees. 

    “This event is a celebration for Noblesville Schools students returning to school after summer break, but it also highlights the special connection between the district and the Noblesville community,” said Marnie Cooke, director of marketing and communications for Noblesville Schools. “We invite community organizations to apply to exhibit at the event and also invite all community members to join in the fun and learn more about Noblesville Schools.” 

    Community organizations interested in exhibiting at the Back to School BASH can apply here no later than June 25. Organizations interested in serving as a sponsor for the event can contact Marnie Cooke at marnie_cooke@nobl.k12.in.us
  • Narcan training session scheduled in Cicero
    5/23/2018 

    The Hamilton North Public Library and Cicero Kiwanis Club are inviting the public to attend a free education and training seminar on the life-saving drug naloxone from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Hamilton North Public Library in Cicero.

    Jim Ginder, Health Education Specialist, Hamilton County Health Department, returns to Cicero to share how to save lives through administering the opiate antidote naloxone, which is sold under the drug name, Narcan. The session provides the opportunity to learn about this growing problem and the impact on the community.

    Those who attend the entire one hour training session will be given one dose of the medicine which they can keep or donate it to their local police or fire department.

    “While we may be the healthiest county in the state, we’re not immune from this nationwide problem,” said Ginder. “This problem, which kills around 115 people a day nationwide, extends into every corner of our county and it’s going to take every one of us to fight it.”

     

  • Hamilton County residents earn top Girl Scouts' award
    5/23/2018 

    Indianapolis– Katherine Conrad and Rhiannon Johns have both earned the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest award a girl can earn in Girl Scouting. They will receive their awards during Girl Scouts of Central Indiana's Girls of Distinction ceremony held June 9 at the JW Marriott in Indianapolis.

    Conrad’s Girl Scout Gold Award project, entitled Redefining the “M” in Stem, addressed the fact that 1.3 million schools in the United States don’t offer children access to music education. Conrad, a graduate of Noblesville High School, plans to attend Ball State University where she will study music and theatre.

    Johns’ Girl Scout Gold Award project, inspired by her own relationship with her grandmother, addressed the loneliness suffered by senior citizens. 
    Johns, a graduate of Fishers High School, plans to attend IUPUI and study finance.

  • 5/23/2018 WESTFIELD — Emily Minett’s home run in the second inning and two-run home run in the fourth helped Noblesville take a 3-0 lead over the Fishers Tigers, and despite a furious comeback, the Millers were victorious 4-3.

    After a scoreless first inning, Minett hit her first home run off of the inning’s first pitch. After some excellent fielding kept both teams off the scoreboard any further, the fourth inning featured Taylor Madison’s double. Minett’s home run made the score 3-0 but Fishers would fight back in the bottom of the sixth inning.

    The Tigers would get things going with Courtney James getting a base hit and then stealing second. Brooke Benson would bring her home with another base hit before Hannah Mays’s home run that made the score 3-3 heading to the final inning of regulation.
  • Guerin invites youth to summer basketball camp
    5/22/2018 

    In less than two weeks, the annual Guerin Catholic's Boys Basketball Camp will be held from June 4-8 in the high school's Eagles Nest gymnasium.

    Times of the camp run from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. for boys going into first, second and third grades next fall. For boys going into the fourth, fifth and sixth grades, camp will run from 10:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. each day. The afternoon session runs from 1 p.m. to 2:30 pm. for boys going into the seventh and eighth grades.

    Coaches, current Guerin Catholic players, and 2014 All-State Golden Eagle and All-Academic Horizon League selection and IUPUI standout Aaron Brennan will teach and work with the boys on fundamental basketball skills during the week. Former IU player and Guerin Catholic assistant Tom Pritchard will direct Guerin Catholic boys varsity head coach Pete Smith's camp.

  • Student Athlete Tip of the Week
    5/22/2018 According to an article in the Indianapolis Star, one of the top returning baseball teams in the state has had a disappointing regular season, but like all teams, hope to peak during the state tournament.

    A quote by one of their three Division I pitching recruits explains why he thinks his team will be ready for the challenges ahead.

    "It is good for us because it makes us accountable. When we lose, we see how it affects everybody in the community. It is good for us to have that leadership position in the community because you should be accountable for what you are doing."
  • Barbara Lee (Cline) Marcotte
    5/23/2018 

    Barbara Lee (Cline) Marcotte, 69, of Noblesville, passed away May 22, 2018, surrounded by her loving husband and daughters.

    She was born July 3, 1948 in Mishawaka, Indiana, to Percy “Buck” Cline and Norma Cline.

  • Gerald R. Edgreen
    5/22/2018 Gerald R. Edgreen, 82, Lapel, passed away Sunday, May 20, 2018, at Harbour Manor Health and Living in Noblesville following an extended illness.

    He was born on Oct. 4, 1935, in Brockway, Pennsylvania.
  • 5/22/2018 Mark Alan Brim, 56, of Brownsburg, passed away on Friday, May 18, 2018, at his home. 

    He was born on Sept. 16, 1961, in Indianapolis.
  • 5/18/2018 Dear Editor, 

    In the early 2000s, leaders in state government determined that the Indiana Department of Environmental Management should team with businesses to help protect valuable resources. A partnership – instead of strictly a punitive approach – has been successful.

    That is a lesson still being learned in Washington. Although regulatory efforts under the current administration are taking a more thoughtful tactic, one Indiana company is suffering from the actions of the prior regime at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

    Navient, which services 12 million student loan customers, is based in Fishers with additional operations in Muncie. The company was sued by CFPB two days before President Obama left office. Richard Cordray had spent four years investigating Navient, citing it for “systematically and illegally failing borrowers.”

    No evidence to substantiate the claims exists. The company produced 450,000 pages of documents, hundreds of hours of phone recording and more than 30 written reports before charges were filed. 
  • 5/15/2018 Dear Editor, 

    For 15 years, I have been asking for the cooperation of our Noblesville City government to help alleviate the problem of speeding traffic on Hannibal Street between 10th and 19th streets. I have spoken to the city council, two police chiefs, two mayors, the captain of the patrol division and anyone who would listen. So far nobody has listened. I have received nothing but lip service from those we have entrusted with keeping our families and community safe. 

    I have spoken with almost all of my neighbors in the second ward area and many agree that this is a real problem. By the time drivers travel from 10th to 11th streets they are often exceeding the posted speed limit. When they come from the east, they will often be traveling 10 to 15 mph more than the posted 25 mph speed limit. 

    This is a residential neighborhood with many young children in the area. 

    The worst part is drivers are often traveling 35 or even 40 mph past the playground at Seminary Park and the mail trucks are consistently the worst offenders.
  • 5/6/2018 Dear Editor, 

    As we embark on the last week of this election, we wanted to share some things about our dad, Mitch Russell, with all of you. Our dad is hands down the best dad and Pappy anyone could ask for. 

    Our whole lives our parents have always been there for us no matter what the situation. They have loved us unconditionally, kept us on the right path and they inspire us to just be good people. As much as our dad has done for us, he has never been just our dad. He has always been the community’s dad. 

    Our parents took in anyone that needed a place to call home, even if it was just a few hours, and loved them just as they loved us. Our parents cooked them meals, coached them, gave them life advice and more importantly just let them know they were loved and what kind of person they could become.
  • Turning 12 with new hairdo, cell phone and pierced ears
    5/23/2018 Today is a special day in our household. 

    It's my daughter's 12th birthday. 

    Yes, 12. Almost a teenager.

    I haven’t cried yet. Even though my sixth-grader seems all grown up.

    When I wrote about my daughter’s 10th birthday two years ago, she hadn’t yet asked for her own cell phone or to have her ears pierced.

    Well, that time has come. 

    Not only does she want her ears pierced for her 12th birthday today, but she also put on her birthday list, her own cell phone. An iPhone, to be exact. She even did the research to see which had the best reviews, including the best camera.
  • ABSOLUTELY ABIGAIL - How can we lessen the pain?
    5/22/2018 My intention this week was to write a lighthearted article, but then we had another school shooting. As I pondered this column, my 21-year-old daughter, a senior at Purdue University, shared her thoughts on social media. She so beautifully articulated what I was feeling that I asked if I could share her words with you. So, in lieu of “Clearly Claremohr,” I give you “Absolutely Abigail.” 

    Pain has an odd way of revealing itself. Physically. Mentally. Emotionally. Which is worse? Is it the physical manifestation, which can be seen? The mental agony of being stuck inside your own head and not being able to escape? Or maybe the emotional misery that causes your heart to ache? Who am I to be a judge on how someone suffers?

    There is so much hurt in the world that I can’t even begin to explain it or try to measure one heartache against the next. And even if I tried, I could never find the right level of smiling or frowning on the chart therapists and doctors use, because pain cannot be quantified that easily.

    Physical pain: being shot in the head while at a concert.

    Mental pain: a mass shooter’s mother trying to figure out what caused her child to turn into a monster.

    Emotional pain: the heartache that a friend, family member, or nation feels for innocent lives lost.
  • 5/20/2018 The Legislative Council, on which I serve, recently met to assign topics for the General Assembly to study during the summer and fall months. Lawmakers will use this interim period to prepare for the 2019 legislative session and determine whether or not to pursue new laws based on their findings. These summer study committees play an integral role in the legislative process and help pave the way for lawmakers to address a variety of issues on behalf of Hoosiers. 

    Human trafficking is the fastest-growing criminal industry in the world. To build on the state’s ongoing efforts to end human trafficking and get victims the help they need, the Interim Study Committee on Corrections and Criminal Code will be looking at the feasibility of establishing a program for helping adult victims of human trafficking. This program could be similar to how the Department of Child Services handles young victims of this crime. Members of this committee will also be determining whether state agencies would be in the position to provide oversight and administer programs to stop human trafficking in Indiana. 

    Those serving on the Interim Study Committee on Public Health, Behavioral Health and Human Services will be conducting an in-depth study of medically supervised therapies involving marijuana. With 29 other states and Washington, D.C., allowing the use of the marijuana plant for medical purposes, many Hoosiers want to know what direction Indiana will take.
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


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This Week's Events

5/20/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
5/21/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
5/22/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
5/22/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
5/23/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
5/24/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
5/25/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
5/25/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
5/26/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

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