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The Times photos by Anthony Lombardi // CONTROLLED BLAZE: Smoke from a controlled prairie burn at Strawtown Koteewi Park in Noblesville fills the sky Friday afternoon. The fire is designed to manage non-native plants and trees to the grasslands and is done once every three to five years.
The Times photos by Anthony Lombardi // CONTROLLED BLAZE: Smoke from a controlled prairie burn at Strawtown Koteewi Park in Noblesville fills the sky Friday afternoon. The fire is designed to manage non-native plants and trees to the grasslands and is done once every three to five years.
Saturday, April 21, 2018 10:49 AM
The blaze was on. 

A controlled prairie burn designed to remove non-native plants and trees to the grasslands at Strawtown Koteewi Park in Noblesville took place Friday — and the spectacle was hard to miss for drivers on Strawtown Avenue. 

The burn, which covered about 150 acres of the 860-acre park and sent smoke into the sky as far as the eye could see, is of vital importance in managing a habitat that’s almost become extinct in the Hoosier state. 

“In Indiana, we’ve lost probably about 98 percent of our grasslands,” said Jeff Kiefer, an Indiana private lands coordinator at U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “There’s a lot of species, particularly migratory birds and some endangered species that rely on grassland habitats, and generally the bigger the grassland that you can develop, the better.”

And how does one sustain an endangered habitat? With fire, of course.
Chuck Goodrich
Chuck Goodrich State Representative District 29 People First
  • A chance to see inside of Prevail
    4/23/2018 Prevail’s mission hasn’t changed. Providing services for victims of crime and abuse. But its programs have grown. Its staff has grown. And now its space has grown.

    Prevail invites the community to tour its facility, including its new expanded space, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony with Noblesville Mayor John Ditslear at 2 p.m. at 1100 S. Ninth St., Suite 100, Noblesville.

    “It’s an opportunity to see what we actually do inside this building,” said Susan Ferguson, Prevail’s executive director. “I think a lot of people drive by and don’t know what we do, so this is a great opportunity.”

    Last week, when I was invited by Ferguson to tour Prevail’s office, I was amazed at the wonderful space and the growing number of employees who serve Prevail, a victims’ assistance agency founded in July 1986 by Beth Gehlhausen to advocate for and serve victims of crime and abuse in Hamilton County. 
  • 4/21/2018 Thousands of best friends will reunite this weekend. 

    The Best Buddies Friendship Walk, an annual event hosted by Best Buddies Indiana, is scheduled to take place Sunday at the Celebration Plaza at White River State Park. 

    The organization raises awareness and funds to support inclusion for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) -- and it’s the relationships people within the program form that bring joy to those involved. 

    "The Best Buddies Friendship Walk is an excellent opportunity for the community to see our mission in action as thousands of ‘buddies’ participate in the event together," said Best Buddies Indiana State Director Natalie Seibert. “It is truly heartwarming to see the one-to-one friendships that have been formed between individuals with IDD and their peers.”
  • Main Street names new executive director
    4/21/2018 The Noblesville Main Street executive committee and its board of directors announced Thursday night the naming of Lorna Steele as the organization’s newest executive director. 

    Steele, 27, joins Noblesville Main Street after most recently serving as assistant recreation director for the City of Noblesville Parks & Recreation department.

    “I think Noblesville Main Street is unique as far as an organization in Hamilton County,” Steele said. “I think the collaboration with the City, the businesses and all of the event planning was just really appealing to me. I just really love what they stand for and the things they do in the community.” 

    Steele, who was selected from a pool of about 20 applicants, doesn’t officially start her new role until April 30. But she’s already come up with a few ideas she’d like the nonprofit organization to consider. 
  • COACH'S CORNER: J.R. MOFFATT
    4/24/2018 

    Coach's Corner is a 'Q' and 'A' featuring the coaches of Hamilton County high schools. This week's volunteer is Hamilton Heights varsity baseball head coach J.R. Moffatt. 

    Q: This is your first year as the varsity baseball head coach at Hamilton Heights — why did you feel now was the right time to step into the role?

    A: Yes, this is my first year as the head coach at Heights. I’ve been the varsity assistant at Hamilton Heights the last two years with Matt Wallace. Coach Wallace left for a job in Michigan after the start of school in the fall. The timing of his departure made it hard to get a replacement since we had no teaching job to offer. When he left, I thought baseball for me here was over as I had committed to helping him however I could. The position went unfilled through the fall and toward the end of November I stuck my head in (Athletic Director) Kurt Ogden’s office and told him to give me a call if he needed any help. I told him we could talk and see if I could help somehow. A couple of days later, I spoke with him and Principal Mason Jarrod and a few minutes into that conversation it kind of became evident as to where it was headed.

    Q: What’s your goal as a first-year varsity head coach, and what do you think is this team’s potential? 

    A: I have deep gratitude for those who have let me be a part of their programs as a player and as a coach. I really want to bring a lot of that into our baseball program. Our program has been really solid the last few years, but we’ve never gotten over the hump to win at a consistently high level come tournament time. This year’s group has potential, but they have to believe and they have to act like and prepare to be champions everyday. It’s hard to not be complacent.

  • Huskies split doubleheader with Elwood
    4/23/2018 The Hamilton Heights baseball team split a doubleheader against Elwood on Saturday. 

    After dropping the opener 9-2, the Huskies bounced back to pick up a 9-4 victory in the second game behind Cole Meyer, who pitched the first five innings to earn the win.

    “We just we’re not very good offensively in that first game,” said Hamilton Heights head coach J.R. Moffatt. “We, for whatever reason sometimes, become very passive at the plate. I’m not sure why since we have the ability to hit the ball … We responded really well in the second game. I wasn’t really sure what we would get from our guys after a between game pep talk, where I expressed to them my less than thrilled feelings about what I perceive as a lack of toughness and passion.” 

    Gabe Reel pitched two shutout innings in relief of Meyer in game two to seal the win, as Meyer helped his own cause at the plate. The senior collected three hits, including a double, three runs scored and an RBI. 
  • Lady Huskies defeat conference rival
    4/21/2018 

    Hamilton Heights girls tennis picked up a 5-0 win at home Friday night as they defeated conference foe Lewis Cass.

    The Huskies got straight set wins from Anna Carl at No. 1 singles, Abby Weber at No. 3 singles, Kylie Rose and Emma Knowles at No. 1 doubles and Kinsey Dimmock and Emily Peterson at No. 2 doubles. No. 2 singles player Kennedy Hunter picked up a hard fought three-set win to round out the match for the Huskies.

    “We were thrilled to be able to play match with the sun shining and the temperatures decent. On top of that, our girls played some of their best tennis of the year across the board,” said Hamilton Heights head coach Cameron Scott. “In particular, Kennedy Hunter at No. 2 really played strong. She continues to hit the ball better and better every time she steps on the court.”

     
  • Gary Earl Lucas
    4/24/2018 Gary Earl Lucas, 72, of Anderson, passed away Sunday, April 22, 2018, at his home surrounded by friends and family following an extended illness.

    He was born on May 24, 1945, in Indianapolis to William Earl and Martha Pauline (Brough) Lucas.
  • Jill Cox
    4/24/2018 Jill Cox, 68, of Noblesville, passed away on Friday, April 20, 2018, at IU Health University Hospital in Indianapolis after a battle with cancer. 

    She was born — the first baby born of the year — on Jan. 1, 1950, in Lebanon, to Joseph and June (Taylor) Blazier.
  • 4/24/2018 Gordon A. Hanlin, 80, of Sheridan, passed away on Friday April 20, 2018, at his home after a short illness. 

    Mr. Hanlin was born Sept. 10, 1937, in Union City, Pennsylvania, to Kenneth and Marjorie Hanlin.
  • 4/19/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    There has been many reports about the poor condition of Indianapolis roads now that winter is finally wrapping up. However, it's not just Indianapolis.

    Interstates and highways in and around Indianapolis, which are under the jurisdiction of the Indiana Department of Transportation, are just as bad. Hitting a pothole at 45 miles per hour or faster can be devastating. 

    I can think of at least five people off the top of my head who have required tire repairs due to hitting potholes in and around Indianapolis city streets and highways. I myself recently had to, as well.

    I report as many potholes as I can using the Indianapolis Mayor's Action Center RequestIndy app, but the Indiana Department of Transportation’s website simply has a webform to fill out. There's no way to check the progress of your report or find out if INDOT is doing anything about it, other than to wait and see if the pothole you reported is going to get fixed.

     
  • 4/19/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    The elected sheriff assumes three core job duties when taking office:

    • Provide law enforcement protection for the unincorporated population of the county and assist, when needed, those municipal and town police departments protecting the incorporated population.
    • Operate and maintain the County Jail and Juvenile Detention Center.
    • Serve and protect the seven state courts housed in the Government and Judicial Center.

    The sheriff’s operating budget is $17.3 million, which includes 216 personnel and a fleet of more than 100 vehicles. The staff consists of 61 sworn police officers, 131 staff assigned to the corrections operation and 24 civilian staff.

    The next sheriff will face many challenges:

     
    • 4/17/2018 Dear Editor, 

      The front page announcement with picture on April 10 that our leaders approved and gladly announced with a ceremony the building of more jail cells was a sad sight to me.

      Do we need more jail space? What is causing this agreed upon need?

      We have 5 percent of the world’s population and 20 percent of its jail population. What is wrong with this picture?

      Are our fellow citizens more uncivilized than the world's average person? Are our neighbors’ behaviors really so unacceptable that we need to take them from their families and jobs to lock them away?
    • A chance to see inside of Prevail
      4/23/2018 Prevail’s mission hasn’t changed. Providing services for victims of crime and abuse. But its programs have grown. Its staff has grown. And now its space has grown.

      Prevail invites the community to tour its facility, including its new expanded space, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony with Noblesville Mayor John Ditslear at 2 p.m. at 1100 S. Ninth St., Suite 100, Noblesville.

      “It’s an opportunity to see what we actually do inside this building,” said Susan Ferguson, Prevail’s executive director. “I think a lot of people drive by and don’t know what we do, so this is a great opportunity.”

      Last week, when I was invited by Ferguson to tour Prevail’s office, I was amazed at the wonderful space and the growing number of employees who serve Prevail, a victims’ assistance agency founded in July 1986 by Beth Gehlhausen to advocate for and serve victims of crime and abuse in Hamilton County. 
    • HAMILTON HEALTH - The Season of Sneezing
      4/23/2018 

      It’s once again time to run my annual column on allergies. Many of our readers are probably already cursing the annual return of allergy symptoms. The pollen levels in Indiana are already ramping up as spring (hopefully) arrives for good.

      Allergies are a major problem for many people. When allergy sufferers are asked about their quality of life, they generally rate allergies as more bothersome than heart disease and sometimes even cancer. There are many causes of allergies, but I want to focus on the seasonal type.

      Seasonal allergies are caused by pollen. Pollen actually contains a plant’s male DNA; it is analogous to sperm in animals. The goal of any biologic organism is to spread its genes as far and wide as possible. Pollen is the perfect vehicle to accomplish this task.

      There are two main categories of pollen – anemophilous (wind-loving) and entomophilous (insect-loving). Anemophilous pollen is very lightweight, which allows it to move great distances, particularly on windy days. In fact, engineers have used the geometric shapes of some of these pollen grains to design golf ball dimples to help the balls fly farther.

    • 4/23/2018 Indiana Grown recently reached a milestone, with 1,000 members joining the program since being launched three years ago. This statewide agriculture initiative helps consumers more easily identify and purchase products grown, raised, produced and processed in Indiana, while assisting members with marketing their goods.

      Hoosiers spend $16 billion a year buying food, but less than 10 percent of that amount goes toward locally sourced products. With Indiana Grown, consumers can better identify local products at kiosks and in grocery stores, restaurants, farmers markets, convenience marts, wineries and breweries, as well as online. Indiana Grown products can be marked with an identifiable label and logo, and include a variety of purchasable merchandise like fruit, candles and lumber.

      In Hamilton County, Indiana Grown members include Grilliant Foods, KingCal Kitchen, Old Picket Fence Antiques, Legacy Images, and Trietsch Farms. Information on these and other Indiana Grown members can be found at www.IndianaGrown.org. Recipes made with fresh Indiana Grown products, a local shopping guide and community events are also featured on this site.
    • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

      The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

      The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
      The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

      Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


       


    Chuck Goodrich
    Chuck Goodrich State Representative District 29 People First

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    This Week's Events

    4/22/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/23/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/24/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/24/2018
    Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
    4/25/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/26/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/27/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
    4/27/2018
    Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
    4/28/2018
    This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

    Tuesday, April 24, 2018

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