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State Rep. Tony Cook (R-Cicero) discusses legislation making its way through the Indiana General Assembly. Cook and other state leaders met with members of Hamilton County’s four chambers of commerce during the Legislative Series Breakfast Friday.
Photo provided State Rep. Tony Cook (R-Cicero) discusses legislation making its way through the Indiana General Assembly. Cook and other state leaders met with members of Hamilton County’s four chambers of commerce during the Legislative Series Breakfast Friday.
Saturday, February 17, 2018 12:00 AM
FISHERS – Indiana is struggling to navigate the crossroads between the old and new economies.
Traditional business has been met by non-traditional avenues of the economy, including AirB&B, Uber, online shopping, people renting their own vehicles, and even Tesla. Many of these new economic avenues are not part of the traditional tax structure and state legislators are working to find ways to include them.
Several legislators, including Rep. Kathy Kreag Richardson, Rep. Tony Cook and Sen Victoria Spartz, met with members of Hamilton County’s four chambers of commerce, to give a “halftime report” on action at the Statehouse during this year’s short session.
“This new economy affects Hamilton County is so many ways,” said Rep. Todd Huston. “We’ve built a lot of things off of taxes generated by car rentals, hotel room rental fees, we just didn’t imagine how this new economy would affect our funding strategies,”
House Speaker Brian Bosma said Indiana isn’t alone, other states struggle with the issue as well.
“We’ve found ourselves at this intersection between the old and new economies and we’re working hard to find solutions that benefit both,” he said.
Captain Dennis Quakenbush for Sheriff
Sheriff Bowen Endorses Captain Dennis Quakenbush for Sheriff of Hamilton County.
  • ‘New economy’ challenging state officials
    2/17/2018 FISHERS – Indiana is struggling to navigate the crossroads between the old and new economies.
    Traditional business has been met by non-traditional avenues of the economy, including AirB&B, Uber, online shopping, people renting their own vehicles, and even Tesla. Many of these new economic avenues are not part of the traditional tax structure and state legislators are working to find ways to include them.
    Several legislators, including Rep. Kathy Kreag Richardson, Rep. Tony Cook and Sen Victoria Spartz, met with members of Hamilton County’s four chambers of commerce, to give a “halftime report” on action at the Statehouse during this year’s short session.
    “This new economy affects Hamilton County is so many ways,” said Rep. Todd Huston. “We’ve built a lot of things off of taxes generated by car rentals, hotel room rental fees, we just didn’t imagine how this new economy would affect our funding strategies,”
    House Speaker Brian Bosma said Indiana isn’t alone, other states struggle with the issue as well.
    “We’ve found ourselves at this intersection between the old and new economies and we’re working hard to find solutions that benefit both,” he said.
  • 2/16/2018 A threat, made by a Noblesville High School student against the school, made Thursday, were found not to be credible, the corporation said in a statement released Thursday night.
    The threat, made during a bus ride home from school, was reported by two students using the corporation’s confidential “SpeakUp” reporting app on the students’ iPads.
    NHS adminstrators and Noblesville Police immediately made contact with the students making the threat and determined it was not credible.
    Administrators have taken appropriate action with the student to address this issue.
    “We would like to send our appreciation to the NHS students who chose to speak-up and share the concern. It's important as a community that we take the time to listen, be cognizant of things happening around us, and report them when we aren't comfortable or are concerned. These two students did the right thing. We ask that you have the conversation with your child about reaching out to an adult when they have a concern or reporting their concern via Noblesville Schools’ SpeakUp app,” the statement read.
  • 2/16/2018 Many of the Indiana Transportation Museum's materials, cleaned from its site in Forest Park, are usable products necessary to safely operate its antique engines, passenger cars, rolling stock and rail lines.
    That’s the conclusion of the ELAM Group, a Noblesville-based environmental firm assisting ITM with cleanup of the Forest Park property.
    ITM lost its lease in Forest Park, and is required to clean up the site. It has completed the first stage, and is ready to progress to underground testing.
    The Indiana Transportation Museum has completed the first stage of its cleanup of its site in Forest Park, and is set to begin step 2. 
    Step 2 will require soil borings to test the soil beneath the top soil.
    “The next phase of the testing involves sub-surface soil testing which requires drilling into the soil to see if any pollutants have been released into the ground. The number of borings to be taken is over 5 times more than typical. This below ground testing will take considerable time, and samples will take time to analyze,” said John McNichols, ITM Board chairman.
  • Millers come up just short in Johnson’s return
    2/17/2018 NOBLESVILLE – Noblesville got a huge effort from junior Zack Johnson and freshman Evan Wilson in the fourth quarter on Friday night but came up just short against Avon. 

    The short-handed Millers fell, 53-52, to the Orioles (3-18), breaking Avon’s 10-game losing streak. 

    “Tremendous effort tonight,” Noblesville head coach Brian McCauley said. “We’re really proud of the guys who played tonight.”

    Noblesville was missing six players, including all five starters, but fought valiantly in a tough situation. The group of players were suspended from the game for breaking a team rule. 

    The Millers did have one player that’s been missing for weeks in Zack Johnson. The junior wingman had been sidelined with an ankle injury but returned in a big way Friday scoring a game-high 21 points, including 15 in the fourth quarter. 
  • Munson, Hansen lead Guerin over Pendleton Heights
    2/17/2018 Guerin Catholic received stellar performances from a pair of seniors to get back in the win column Friday night at Pendleton Heights. 

    Zach Munson scored a game-high 24 points and Jack Hansen poured in 20 to lead the Golden Eagles to a 71-64 comeback victory over the Arabians. 

    After a back-and-forth first half, which ended with the score locked at 35, Munson and Hansen took over in the third. The duo combined to score 12 of the Golden Eagles’ 16 points in the quarter, as Guerin’s defense held Pendleton Heights to just nine to take a 51-44 edge heading into the final stanza. 

    Justin Shupe opened the fourth with a field goal to cut the Arabians’ deficit to five, but a basket by Hansen pushed the lead back to seven. Shupe finished with a team-high 19 points on 8-of-13 shooting. 
  • 2/17/2018 AJ Field saved his best for last. 

    The Hamilton Heights junior scored 14 of his team-high 21 points in the fourth quarter of the Huskies 69-68 win over the Twin Lakes Indians Friday night in Monticello, Indiana. The victory gave the Huskies a fifth-place finish in the Hoosier Conference. 

    With 3:10 left in the fourth quarter — the score knotted at 58-all — Field buried a 3-pointer from the corner to give the Huskies a 61-58 lead. Twin Lakes reclaimed a two-point edge with less than a minute to play, but then the Huskies found their man. 
  • Rachael E. Ratliff
    2/16/2018 Rachael E. Ratliff, 37, of Noblesville, passed away Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, at IU Health University Hospital in Indianapolis.
    She was born March 5, 1980, to Alvin and Gail (Snider) Ratliff in Indianapolis
  • 2/16/2018 Mary E. (Stage) McCullough of San Antonio, Texas, passed away suddenly Jan. 8, 2018.
    She was born May 12, 1940 to Anna and Charles Stage in Noblesville.
  • Paul Charles Darling
    2/16/2018 Paul Charles Darling, age 75, of Westfield, passed away Monday morning, Feb. 12, 2018, at his home surrounded by his loving family.
    Born Feb. 27, 1942 in Indianapolis, he was the son of the late Leo G. and Mary E. (Kelly) Darling.
  • 2/7/2018 Tri Kappa of Noblesville would like to say THANK YOU to the CITIZENS OF NOBLESVILLE and beyond for your generous donations to the 2017 Red Stocking Fund. You helped us surpass our goal of $10,000.00. We raised $13,709.00 for the Annual Tri Kappa Red Stocking Fund. 100% of the money donated will be distributed to the school children of Noblesville through the Noblesville Township Trustee’s Office and Noblesville Schools. Since 2006, the Community of Noblesville has raised over $147,000.00 through this fundraiser. 
  • 1/17/2018 “An informed citizenry is at the heart of a dynamic democracy,” wrote Thomas Jefferson.
    Like it or not, journalists do the lion-share of reporting to Americans as to what its government, be it national, state, or local, is doing or considering.
    So during a time when we can choose from a multitude of news outlets, it’s important that we understand basic principles of journalism – independence, accuracy, fairness, the separation of opinion from news reporting.
    That education should start no later than high school with students learning the responsibilities that come with the freedom of speech and freedom of the press guaranteed by the First Amendment.
  • 1/17/2018 Keeping in mind the constantly changing national news – by the day or even the hour – I would like to put forth some thoughts based upon my own ideological frame of reference:
  • 2/17/2018 The school principals and teachers are ready, and the excitement is building.
    Every two years since 2012, Noblesville Schools Education Foundation invites in the Harlem Wizards basketball team as a fundraiser for the district.
    Well, it’s that time again. Harlem Wizards will return this Wednesday to The Mill.
    For those who haven’t experienced a Harlem Wizards show, it is definitely one not to miss.
    The world-famous team shows off its slam dunks, tricks, hoops and alley oops while playing against Noblesville Schools Mighty Millers, made up of our favorite teachers and principals and staff..
    There are so many fun things about attending this game. 
  • 2/17/2018 It is something we do not think about often, because we have been told that darkness equals evil, or sin, or that darkness is the place where God is not. Many of us fear the dark not because of the absence of light, but fear is manifested from not knowing what is in the dark. Darkness is not a bad thing it is just a thing. God made both the light and the dark, as the writer of Genesis describes.
    In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God[ swept over the face of the waters. Then God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light. And God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day. Genesis 1:1-5
  • 2/17/2018 Note: This is the first in a three part series on Depression and Parkinsons 
    Caregivers and those battling Parkinsons Disease (PD) cite depression as an insidious but all too often neglected facet of the disease. Medical specialists often focus on the physical aspects of PD and do not ask about, much less aggressively treat, this common symptom. Yet studies show that up to 90% of those with PD suffer from Depression and up to 40% of their caregivers report depression as impinging on their quality of life. 
    Depression does not just lower mood, which in turn affects work, activities, general productivity, and relationships; the physiological impact of depression can lower functional ability and even cognition. Depression is characterized by a reduced sense of self -worth and self -efficacy, leading to a downward spiral in mood and behavior. 
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


Captain Dennis Quakenbush for Sheriff
Sheriff Bowen Endorses Captain Dennis Quakenbush for Sheriff of Hamilton County.

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This Week's Events

2/11/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
2/12/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
2/13/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
2/13/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
2/14/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
2/15/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
2/16/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
2/16/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
2/17/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

Saturday, February 17, 2018

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