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Photo provided // Carson Saul “Mr. Crepe” and Elyse Saul “Princess Pie,” the grandchildren of Steve Nelson, owner of Mr. Muffins Trains in Atlanta, Ind., ride with their dad, Jeff,  in “Nicky,” a train built on a truck chassis. The vehicle will offer “train rides” on Saturday during Midwest Rail Fest in Atlanta, in northern Hamilton County.
Photo provided // Carson Saul “Mr. Crepe” and Elyse Saul “Princess Pie,” the grandchildren of Steve Nelson, owner of Mr. Muffins Trains in Atlanta, Ind., ride with their dad, Jeff, in “Nicky,” a train built on a truck chassis. The vehicle will offer “train rides” on Saturday during Midwest Rail Fest in Atlanta, in northern Hamilton County.
Friday, June 22, 2018 4:00 AM

All aboard for Atlanta, Indiana, for this year’s Midwest Rail Fest.

In its second year, the festival celebrates railroading in all forms.

From trains on the tracks to model trains on the table for the hobbyists, as well as Indiana’s rich railroad history, this festival in downtown Atlanta, Hamilton County’s northernmost town, promises a day of fun for train enthusiasts.

The Northern Hamilton County Chamber of Commerce developed Rail Fest as a fundraiser for the Chamber. “Since three of the towns incorporated in our Chamber are on the rail line, it makes sense to explore that history and offer the public an opportunity to experience railroading where it happened,” said Liz Nelson, the Chamber’s vice president.

She was more than happy to talk more about the Rail Fest, which runs 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday in Atlanta, located off of Indiana 19, just less than 13 miles, a 22-minute drive, north from Noblesville.

  • Atlanta’s Rail Fest is all about trains
    6/22/2018 

    All aboard for Atlanta, Indiana, for this year’s Midwest Rail Fest.

    In its second year, the festival celebrates railroading in all forms.

    From trains on the tracks to model trains on the table for the hobbyists, as well as Indiana’s rich railroad history, this festival in downtown Atlanta, Hamilton County’s northernmost town, promises a day of fun for train enthusiasts.

    The Northern Hamilton County Chamber of Commerce developed Rail Fest as a fundraiser for the Chamber. “Since three of the towns incorporated in our Chamber are on the rail line, it makes sense to explore that history and offer the public an opportunity to experience railroading where it happened,” said Liz Nelson, the Chamber’s vice president.

    She was more than happy to talk more about the Rail Fest, which runs 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday in Atlanta, located off of Indiana 19, just less than 13 miles, a 22-minute drive, north from Noblesville.

  • Cicero Kiwanis plays host to pancake breakfast, silent auction
    6/21/2018 The Kiwanis Club of Cicero is hosting its annual Pancake Breakfast and Silent Auction July 7. The event will be conducted at the Cicero Christian Church at 1715 Stringtown Pike, Cicero, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. 

    New to this year’s event is a special recognition celebration of area first responders. Emergency (EMS, Fire, Police, Sheriff) service personnel will be on hand with their fire trucks, ambulances, police, sheriff and emergency service vehicles for show and discussion. 

    “On behalf of the Cicero Kiwanis, we cordially invite all members of the community to this special breakfast as we celebrate the courage and sacrifice of the men and women of our local first responders,” said Keith Ecker, President, Cicero Kiwanis Club. “These local heroes fight to serve and protect our community, an act we can often take for granted.”

    Breakfast consists of eggs, pancakes, sausage, biscuits and gravy, fruit and beverages. Cost is $7 for adults and $5 for children ages 5 to 12. Children under 5 are free. The Silent Auction features a wide variety of items including sports tickets, golf packages, themed baskets, electronics, restaurant and specialty gift certificates to name a few.
  • NPD swears in 2 new officers
    6/21/2018 

    The Noblesville Police Department held a ceremony June 12 to officially swear in two of their newest police officers. 

    The newly sworn officers, Sam Fry and Cory Munsell, were officially hired on April 23.

    The ceremony took place in the council chambers located at City Hall. In attendance for the event were families, friends, members of the community, government officials and officers of the police department. Chief Kevin Jowitt officiated the ceremony. 

    Sam Fry: Fry was born in Berrien Springs, Michigan, in 1985. He graduated from Delta High School in Muncie in 2004. After high school, he attended Ball State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice in 2009. Before accepting a job with NPD, Fry had been employed with the Ball State Police Department since 2009 as a police officer. 

  • Cicero Triathlon returns after 5-year absence
    6/21/2018 Biking. Running. Swimming. All in one race.

    It’s called a triathlon, and it’s going down in Cicero this weekend. 

    Cicero’s Triathlon is scheduled to get underway Saturday at 8 a.m. at Red Bridge Park, located at 697 W. Jackson St., in Cicero. The competition has been a long-time tradition in Cicero that will make its return to the city after a five-year absence – much to the delight of those involved. 

    “(My husband) Brian and I have been very instrumental with reaching out to race directors like Don Carr with Tuxedo Brothers Management out of Carmel,” said Lisa Bear, one of the event coordinators. “I have reached out to him for the last year asking him if he would want to bring the Cicero Triathlon back.”

    The Cicero Triathlon is a three-stage event in which each athlete will compete in a 400-yard swim in Morse Reservoir, an 11-mile bike course and a 3-mile out-and-back run course. A duathlon consisting of a 2-mile run, an 11-mile bike ride and a 3-mile run will also be held. 
  • OUT IN THE OPEN- The Battle Is On Again!
    6/21/2018 The battle is on again. Reconnaissance has become an hourly vigil, elaborate traps are lying in wait and shots have been fired. Unfortunately, the war is only becoming more intense.

    One year ago this month, I wrote about my ongoing tribulations with the cutest but arguably most destructive garden pest in Indiana: the ground squirrel, also known as the chipmunk. I hate to “double dip” on column topics in such a short time frame but in the past week there has been no time to enjoy the outdoors because of an agile and exceptionally bold troublemaker.

    As previously mentioned, we feed birds’ year-around. In fact, we have multiple feeders going constantly and our small backyard is quite literally a menagerie of songbirds. There are few moments during the day when we don’t see some type of interesting bird flitting about and our finch colony is becoming the talk of the neighborhood.

    That is until the damnable ground squirrel shinnies up the fence, scares away the birds, leaps to a sunflower stalk then climbs hand-over-hand to the squirrel-proof feeder. 
  • Training facility breaks ground at Grand Park
    6/20/2018 A new sports performance facility in Hamilton County will soon make young athletes feel like they are professionals.

    Pro X, a multi-sport athlete development program, is scheduled to open by Westfield’s Grand Park in early 2019. 

    City leaders, including Mayor Andy Cook, joined owners of Pro X Wednesday to break ground on the facility that will look to level the playing field for athletes and provide them access to great coaches, skill trainers and playing facilities.

    “Here at Pro X, we feel truly blessed and we’re excited to call Westfield and Grand Park home,” said Joe Thatcher, a former MLB pitcher and Pro X’s founder and general manager. “Our goal is to compliment this great park.”

    The facility, which is worth $5 million and will be 60-thousand square feet, will be located on the west side of Grand Park.
  • Richard L. Alexander
    6/21/2018 

    Richard L. Alexander, 76 of Noblesville, passed away on June 20, 2018, surrounded by his loving family.

    Born on Sept. 26, 1941, in Sheridan, to Marthann (Johnson) and William Alexander, he lived his life from a young age in Noblesville, attending and graduating from local schools where he met his wife to be and started his life’s work.

  • Joseph Anthony Garber
    6/20/2018 

    Joseph Anthony Garber, 75, of Noblesville, passed away on Tuesday, June 19, 2018, at Riverwalk Village in Noblesville.

    He was born on Dec. 26, 1942, to Joseph and Helen (Plafchan) Garber in Detroit, Michigan.

  • Sydney Marie Brotheridge
    6/20/2018 

    Sydney Marie Brotheridge, 22, passed away on June 9, 2018, in Tanzania, Africa.

    She was born on Dec. 28, 1995, to Eric Brotheridge and Maura Buck. 

  • 6/20/2018 Dear Editor, 

    Why do our young, male students want to harm their classmates?

    In every school shooting, it has been a young, white male who wants to harm his classmates. This is where the problem begins and we should be asking why. What is going on in the heads of these shooters that brings them to carry a gun or guns to school with the intention of harming other students and teachers?

    Are they being bullied and excluded by other students? Are they being overlooked by the teachers while in the classroom? Do they associate with other students who have the tendency of wanting to harm other students for whatever reason? What is their home life like? Do they come from a dysfunctional family or are growing up in a one parent family? 
  • 6/14/2018 Dear Editor, 

    I’ve been to the moon. I’ve been burned. But more often I’m honored. I’m your American flag.

    With 13 stars for colonies clamoring for freedom, I was first flown at Fort Stanwix in New York in 1777—and then carried into battle for the first time at Brandywine in Pennsylvania. By war’s end, I was saluted as the emblem of a sovereign nation, new and free. I’m your American flag.

    But challenges lay ahead. With 15 stars and 15 stripes, I survived shock and shell at Fort McHenry in 1814. With the aid of rockets’ red glare and bombs bursting in air, I was spied from afar at dawn’s early light by a patriot poet. I was then celebrated in sight and song by a fledgling nation. I’m your American flag.

    A half century later and with 33 stars and 13 stripes, I was saddened to see our nation divided. Our brothers’ blood was spilled in battle north and south. But by war’s end, Lincoln’s iconic words at Gettysburg prevailed—a unique nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. But that pledge was yet to be fully fulfilled.
  • 6/11/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    At 9:06 a.m. on May 25, an armed student entered my son’s classroom in Noblesville and opened fire.

    Amazingly, there were no fatalities.

    However, another student and my son were struck numerous times. Thankfully, both are recovering, but the injured student will have an extended hospital stay. Since that surreal day, there have been so many acts of kindness and so many notes of encouragement and prayers that I couldn’t possibly begin to thank everyone personally.

    Please accept the following thanks and know that every act, every word and every prayer has been deeply appreciated.

  • 6/21/2018 A couple of weeks ago, when I wrote about the kiddie rides the Crask family and others operated at Forest Park, I didn’t get into any of the park’s other attractions during the 1950s and ‘60s, mainly because my memories are a little fuzzy.

    Never fear! Former Westfield resident Larry Cloud remembers them well and he sent enough details to fill this column.

    The first thing Larry mentioned was the L-shaped arcade building which held booths with open fronts like you’d see at a carnival. I wasn’t able to track down when the arcade opened, but I did find that Jim Sinders bought that concession from Raymond “Red” Meredith in 1958, the same year the Crasks took over the kiddie rides.

    In the right leg of the “L” was a booth with Skee-Ball machines, where you rolled balls up an incline and tried to get them to fall into holes with various point values. Next to that was a shooting gallery where you could shoot at targets with .22 rifles.
  • 6/17/2018 

    Barbecue season is in full swing and it’s a good time to review food safety. Food-borne illness is something that almost all of us have experienced at some point in our lives.

    Food-borne illness is defined as more than two people having a similar illness with evidence of food as the source. The overall rate of these illnesses has gone down drastically in the last century with improvements in food handling and sanitation. However, we still hear about illness outbreaks.

    There are approximately 76 million cases of food-related illness in the United States each year. There are also about 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Underdeveloped countries, as a group, experience about one billion cases annually and four to six million deaths.

  • 6/17/2018 Welcome back, summer! 

    Summer officially begins on Thursday, ushering in a number of events and activities for the whole family. With the warmer weather and longer days, now is the time to get out and explore everything Noblesville and the state offers. 

    Finding fun and exciting events and attractions in our community is easy, thanks to Visit Hamilton County. Whether traveling to Carmel, Fishers, Noblesville, Westfield or other nearby towns, information to plan your next adventure can be found at visithamiltoncounty.com. Connect with an online trip planner and travel guide, and find special offers for local getaways. 

    Each Thursday, the Noblesville Parks Department hosts free concerts from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Dillon Park. This Friday and then again on July 13, July 27, Aug. 10 and Aug. 24, enjoy Food Truck Friday at Federal Hill Commons. In July, we can look forward to Tenderloin Tuesday with deals on tenderloin sandwiches served at more than 30 local restaurants. 
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


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This Week's Events

6/17/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/18/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/20/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/21/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/23/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

Friday, June 22, 2018

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