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The Times photo by Betsy Reason // Noblesville First Presbyterian Church youth -- Calvin Bocko (from left), William Snyder, Erick Bocko, Howie Wickstrom, Chloe Snyder, Evie Howard, Alexa Gordon, Lindsay Wilson, Erin Wilson and Kingston Gordon -- volunteer during the First Monday Free Lunches at the church, where the community is invited to come for a free meal from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through July.
The Times photo by Betsy Reason // Noblesville First Presbyterian Church youth -- Calvin Bocko (from left), William Snyder, Erick Bocko, Howie Wickstrom, Chloe Snyder, Evie Howard, Alexa Gordon, Lindsay Wilson, Erin Wilson and Kingston Gordon -- volunteer during the First Monday Free Lunches at the church, where the community is invited to come for a free meal from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through July.
Saturday, June 23, 2018 4:00 AM

Summer is officially here, and we’re keeping busy with lots of activities on our calendar.

This was the third week of Noblesville Schools’ summer break, so we popped in on Monday at the First Presbyterian Church’s summer free lunch program.

The church was so successful for its first summer free lunch program in 2017 that organizers decided to continue the program for summer 2018.

A free lunch is served 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through July. Everybody is welcome.

Monday's kid-friendly lunch was like going to an Italian restaurant. Spaghetti, breadsticks, salad, carrots and desserts were on the menu.

Kids from the church -- Calvin and Erick Bocko, Alexa and Kingston Gordon, Evie Howard, William and Chloe Snyder, Howie Wickstrom and Lindsay and Erin Wilson -- helped ladies of the church prepare and serve the lunch.

  • Come for free meal, stay for fellowship Mondays this summer
    6/23/2018 

    Summer is officially here, and we’re keeping busy with lots of activities on our calendar.

    This was the third week of Noblesville Schools’ summer break, so we popped in on Monday at the First Presbyterian Church’s summer free lunch program.

    The church was so successful for its first summer free lunch program in 2017 that organizers decided to continue the program for summer 2018.

    A free lunch is served 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays through July. Everybody is welcome.

    Monday's kid-friendly lunch was like going to an Italian restaurant. Spaghetti, breadsticks, salad, carrots and desserts were on the menu.

    Kids from the church -- Calvin and Erick Bocko, Alexa and Kingston Gordon, Evie Howard, William and Chloe Snyder, Howie Wickstrom and Lindsay and Erin Wilson -- helped ladies of the church prepare and serve the lunch.

  • 6/22/2018 The trial for the 13-year-old boy accused of shooting a student and a teacher at Noblesville West Middle School May 25 has been delayed. 

    The boy's attorney asked Hamilton County Circuit Court Judge Paul Felix to reschedule the trial that had been scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, according to Hamilton County Administrator of Courts Orval Schierholz. 

    A new court date hasn’t been decided, Schierholz said. 
  • Outstanding youth to be honored during Asian Fest
    6/22/2018 

    INDIANAPOLIS - Seven Asian American high school students will be honored by Asian American Alliance (AAAI) this Sunday. Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett will be on hand to present the AAAI Youth Leadership Awards to the students for their stellar achievement in leadership and community service.The awards ceremony will be held at 1:20 pm during the Asian Fest at the Indiana State Museum. 

    The AAAI Youth Leadership Awards recipients are:

    Ishaan Modi, Junior, Hamilton Southeastern High School: Ishaan's community service efforts at HSE helped collect 11,000 pounds of food for the local food pantry and $50,000 for the Riley Dance Marathon. As a member of Young Innovators Quest, he is doing a research on an alternative energy source--waves and natural tides.

    Crystal Xue, Senior, Carmel High School: Three-time Scholar Athlete of Carmel High School, Crystal led Carmel DECA and debate team to one of the most successful competitive seasons. She is the first Asian American to be selected to the Hamilton County 4-H Queen's Court and won the title of Miss Congeniality.

  • Fishers coach reflects on program's 1st title
    6/22/2018 At last, the Fishers’ baseball program brought a championship home.

    It wasn’t easy, but the Tigers defeated Cathedral 4–3 to earn their first IHSAA Class 4A State Title June 16.

    “It was an overwhelming feeling, especially the crowd we had that night, the fans that came down from Fishers were amazing,” said Fishers head coach Matthew Cherry. “The electricity in the crowd and the excitement of finally winning a state title – (I was) so excited for our guys to experience that.”

    Cherry said this season was a total team effort, and the Tigers were only able to accomplish amazing things because everyone was on the same page.

    This Fishers’ squad was the ideal definition of a team: coming together to achieve a common goal, and they did it while having a good time. No one cared how they did it or what they did to earn this goal, all they wanted was to reach it.
  • Bryan Clauson’s organ recipients to attend annual “Strut 2 Save Lives” dog walk
    6/22/2018 

    On Sunday, Indiana Donor Network is once again partnering with the Clauson family as they continue their annual “Strut 2 Save Lives” dog walk in honor of beloved race car driver Bryan Clauson, who saved five lives through organ and tissue donation.

    Bryan, who died in a racing accident in 2016, was one of the top five all-time USAC drivers. This year, two special guests will attend: the recipients of Bryan’s heart and lungs. Bryan’s donation saved both of their lives. Dan Alexander, a 65-year-old Papillion, Nebraska, resident, received Bryan’s heart and Dan Gerdes, a 29-year-old Auburn, Nebraska, resident, received Bryan’s lungs.

    Mr. Gerdes will address the attendees about Bryan’s gift. This will be the first time many members of the Clauson family have met Mr. Gerdes.

    As of Thursday, event attendees have already raised more than $16,000 in honor of Bryan’s donation. All proceeds go to the Indiana Donor Network Foundation to help donor families and recipients. 

  • Cicero Triathlon returns after 5-year absence
    6/21/2018 Biking. Running. Swimming. All in one race.

    It’s called a triathlon, and it’s going down in Cicero this weekend. 

    Cicero’s Triathlon is scheduled to get underway Saturday at 8 a.m. at Red Bridge Park, located at 697 W. Jackson St., in Cicero. The competition has been a long-time tradition in Cicero that will make its return to the city after a five-year absence – much to the delight of those involved. 

    “(My husband) Brian and I have been very instrumental with reaching out to race directors like Don Carr with Tuxedo Brothers Management out of Carmel,” said Lisa Bear, one of the event coordinators. “I have reached out to him for the last year asking him if he would want to bring the Cicero Triathlon back.”

    The Cicero Triathlon is a three-stage event in which each athlete will compete in a 400-yard swim in Morse Reservoir, an 11-mile bike course and a 3-mile out-and-back run course. A duathlon consisting of a 2-mile run, an 11-mile bike ride and a 3-mile run will also be held. 
  • Steven Richard McKee
    6/22/2018 

    Steven Richard McKee, 60, of Noblesville, passed away on Thursday, June 21, 2018, at St. Vincent Fishers Hospital.

    He was born on Nov. 20, 1957, to the late Charles and Phyllis (Yeoman) McKee in DeKalb, Illinois.

  • Richard L. Alexander
    6/21/2018 

    Richard L. Alexander, 76 of Noblesville, passed away on June 20, 2018, surrounded by his loving family.

    Born on Sept. 26, 1941, in Sheridan, to Marthann (Johnson) and William Alexander, he lived his life from a young age in Noblesville, attending and graduating from local schools where he met his wife to be and started his life’s work.

  • Joseph Anthony Garber
    6/20/2018 

    Joseph Anthony Garber, 75, of Noblesville, passed away on Tuesday, June 19, 2018, at Riverwalk Village in Noblesville.

    He was born on Dec. 26, 1942, to Joseph and Helen (Plafchan) Garber in Detroit, Michigan.

  • 6/20/2018 Dear Editor, 

    Why do our young, male students want to harm their classmates?

    In every school shooting, it has been a young, white male who wants to harm his classmates. This is where the problem begins and we should be asking why. What is going on in the heads of these shooters that brings them to carry a gun or guns to school with the intention of harming other students and teachers?

    Are they being bullied and excluded by other students? Are they being overlooked by the teachers while in the classroom? Do they associate with other students who have the tendency of wanting to harm other students for whatever reason? What is their home life like? Do they come from a dysfunctional family or are growing up in a one parent family? 
  • 6/14/2018 Dear Editor, 

    I’ve been to the moon. I’ve been burned. But more often I’m honored. I’m your American flag.

    With 13 stars for colonies clamoring for freedom, I was first flown at Fort Stanwix in New York in 1777—and then carried into battle for the first time at Brandywine in Pennsylvania. By war’s end, I was saluted as the emblem of a sovereign nation, new and free. I’m your American flag.

    But challenges lay ahead. With 15 stars and 15 stripes, I survived shock and shell at Fort McHenry in 1814. With the aid of rockets’ red glare and bombs bursting in air, I was spied from afar at dawn’s early light by a patriot poet. I was then celebrated in sight and song by a fledgling nation. I’m your American flag.

    A half century later and with 33 stars and 13 stripes, I was saddened to see our nation divided. Our brothers’ blood was spilled in battle north and south. But by war’s end, Lincoln’s iconic words at Gettysburg prevailed—a unique nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. But that pledge was yet to be fully fulfilled.
  • 6/11/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    At 9:06 a.m. on May 25, an armed student entered my son’s classroom in Noblesville and opened fire.

    Amazingly, there were no fatalities.

    However, another student and my son were struck numerous times. Thankfully, both are recovering, but the injured student will have an extended hospital stay. Since that surreal day, there have been so many acts of kindness and so many notes of encouragement and prayers that I couldn’t possibly begin to thank everyone personally.

    Please accept the following thanks and know that every act, every word and every prayer has been deeply appreciated.

  • 6/22/2018 The following is a true story. But I have written two alternative final paragraphs.

    My ethical dilemma begins with an insensitive remark I made to a friend. As an apology, I invited him to breakfast at our favorite café, and I sent him a $30.00 gift card to cover our meal.

    We met the next week. When the waiter returned with the card, he informed us there was some credit remaining. “You use it,” said Jim, “and thanks for breakfast.”

    “How much credit is left?” I asked the waiter.

    “Let’s see,” said Jake, “the balance is $971.12. And I think that’s a record at this place. Second place is $13.78.”

    You could have scraped me off the floor with a spatula. “Wait,” I said, “this is a mistake. The card was only for $30.00.”
  • 6/22/2018 I've had enough of someone else's propaganda. I'm for truth, no matter who tells it. I'm for justice, no matter who it's for or against. I'm a human being first and foremost, and as such I am for whoever and whatever benefits humanity as a whole. -- Malcolm X

    On Friday, Sojourners called the above quote, “The Voice of the Day.” Admittedly, I am not an expert on Malcolm X. I only know that he was a civil rights activist and an African American Muslim faith leader in the 60’s. Just like any civil right activist, he was both loathed and loved. Some people feared his rhetoric, and many praised his teachings. He was assassinated in 1965. Sometimes truth sets us free, while it seems that during the 60’s especially, the truth can get you killed. 

    We may have made strides in the right direction concerning racism, but we still have a very long way to go. Turn on any local, or for that matter any news station, and there is enough evidence of the ‘Us’ versus ‘Them’ mentality to convict, fine or imprison 100’s of people a day, just for racial profiling, unjust incarceration, and detainment. How do we fix the problem of ‘fear of the other?’ 
  • 6/21/2018 A couple of weeks ago, when I wrote about the kiddie rides the Crask family and others operated at Forest Park, I didn’t get into any of the park’s other attractions during the 1950s and ‘60s, mainly because my memories are a little fuzzy.

    Never fear! Former Westfield resident Larry Cloud remembers them well and he sent enough details to fill this column.

    The first thing Larry mentioned was the L-shaped arcade building which held booths with open fronts like you’d see at a carnival. I wasn’t able to track down when the arcade opened, but I did find that Jim Sinders bought that concession from Raymond “Red” Meredith in 1958, the same year the Crasks took over the kiddie rides.

    In the right leg of the “L” was a booth with Skee-Ball machines, where you rolled balls up an incline and tried to get them to fall into holes with various point values. Next to that was a shooting gallery where you could shoot at targets with .22 rifles.
  • Contact information for The Times' Public Notice staff

    The Times is Hamilton County's only legally recognized daily newspaper. As such, public notice advertising is accepted and our legals clerk can be reached either via e-mail or by telephone.

    The e-mail address is: legals@thetimes24-7.com.
    The telephone number is: (765) 361-0100, ext. 12.

    Thank you for using The Times, Hamilton County's oldest and only daily newspaper!


     


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This Week's Events

6/17/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/18/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/19/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/20/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/21/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.
6/22/2018
Warner Sallman is an American born artist who was born in the late 19th century. He devoted much of his life to creating religious images that focused on Jesus Christ. Each of Sallman’s pieces is meant to provide a depth of religious value and bring a sense hope and comfort to the viewer. His most famous work is “The Head of Christ”, which he completed in 1941. The timing of this piece could not have been better as the world was in the early stages of World War II, and the U.S. would soon be entering the fight. This work would be printed in pocket size photos and handed out to the soldiers being shipped off to war to provide comfort and inspiration to many. There is a good chance that you have seen this picture as it has been printed hundreds of millions of times. If you would like to see “The Head of Christ” and many more of Warner Sallman's original works then you can visit us at the Scheierman Gallery, located on Anderson University’s campus in Anderson, Indiana. We are open Tuesdays and Fridays from 1-4 p.m. or you can make an appointment to visit. We are closed during university breaks, which can be found on the Anderson University Academic Calendar, with exception to summer break when you can visit by appointment only. We look forward to seeing you! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us.
6/23/2018
This events is primary an Masters event for athletes ages 30 years of age of older. All Events will go according to age groups starting from the youngest to the Oldest and will be on a rolling schedule. Please come with your own implements for the throws. The events will go from Women to Men.

Saturday, June 23, 2018

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