Home | Contact Us | Facebook | Subscribe | Advertise
The Noblesville Times 24-7
  • Hearing Trouble?
    12/10/2019 A patient whose mother is having hearing difficulties asked me to write about the best way to purchase hearing aids. I’d like to begin with some background on hearing.
  • 11/19/2019 This week I’d like to write about a problem that costs taxpayers billions of dollars each year – Medicare fraud and abuse. Medicare paid out $582 billion in payments for services and medications in 2018, accounting for 14% of the federal budget. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) reports that 8.12% of those payments were “improper,” meaning the services were not necessary, did not meet Medicare guidelines, or were downright fraudulent (a decrease from 9.51% in 2017).
  • 11/12/2019 This week I want to address a specific variant of a condition that I’ve been seeing a lot of lately – dizziness. Primary Care doctors in the U.S. see about six million patients a year with dizziness. 
  • 11/5/2019 Someone told me the other day that they thought “restless leg syndrome” (RLS) was a conspiracy created by pharmaceutical companies to sell more medications. You may have seen the commercials for Requip® and Mirapex®, both drugs used to treat this condition.
    People have described symptoms suggestive of restless legs since the 17th Century. The Swedish neurologist Erik Ekborn initially coined the term in the 1940’s. We estimate that between ten to fifteen percent of Americans suffer from restless leg syndrome to some degree. The incidence in women is about twice that of men. About 40 percent of people develop symptoms prior to age twenty. Since symptoms tend to be mild initially and worsen with age, most sufferers are not diagnosed for 10 to 20 years after they start having symptoms.
    The symptoms of RLS are highly variable, but most people describe a bothersome, irresistible urge to move their legs. This urge is worse during periods of inactivity and often interferes with sleep. About 85 percent of sufferers have difficulty falling asleep. Stress and fatigue can also exacerbate the symptoms.
  • 10/30/2019 I’m starting to see a few cases of head lice now that kids have been in school awhile. The critters are white and about the size of a sesame seed. They are known as "obligate ectoparasites." Obligate means they require a placental mammal host to survive (i.e. humans) and ectoparasites means they live outside the human body and need a host to survive.
  • 10/29/2019 I’m starting to see a few cases of head lice now that kids have been in school awhile. The critters are white and about the size of a sesame seed. They are known as "obligate ectoparasites." Obligate means they require a placental mammal host to survive (i.e. humans) and ectoparasites means they live outside the human body and need a host to survive. They do this by feeding on the host’s blood and can't live off of a body for more than a day or so. Lice are spread by direct contact of a person's head or hair with an infested individual or through sharing personal items such as hats, towels, brushes, helmets, hair ties or even car seat headrests. They do not jump or fly and are not transmitted by pets.
    Adult lice survive on a person for about one to three months. A female louse lays about three to five eggs, known as "nits," each day and glues them to the hair shafts of the host, close to the scalp. The eggs require the warmth of the scalp to incubate. A louse may lay up to 300 eggs in her adult life. The eggs take about ten days to hatch and the new lice need an immediate blood meal to survive. They then take another seven to ten days to mature to the point they can start laying eggs.
  • 10/22/2019 “All parts of the body if used in moderation and exercised in labors to which each is accustomed, become thereby healthy and well developed, and age slowly; but if unused and left idle, they become liable to disease, defective in growth, and age quickly.” - Hippocrates
    Few things benefit the body more than maintaining physical fitness. While doctors routinely recommend exercise for younger patients, we’re realizing how important it is for our older patients as well. Regular exercise, even in one’s senior years, can still reduce your risk of a number of health conditions, particularly heart attacks, strokes, and falls. It also may be one of the few things to slow the onset of dementia.
    Most communities are blessed to have many options available for exercise, especially programs that are supervised. I prefer these activities because a trained professional typically leads the group. This person can make recommendations to get the most out of a program in the safest way possible.
    Why is regular exercise so important for seniors? You may have noticed that as our bodies age a number of physiologic changes occur. We lose muscle mass and tone that leads to weakness and problems with balance. Flexibility becomes an issue (the most common cause of night time leg cramps). Our bones become weaker from a lack of weight-bearing activity. Balance problems and weak bones can lead to falls and fractures. Our hearts and lungs can get out of shape, resulting in reduced stamina and difficulty breathing with activity. This can lead to a reduced level of confidence & independence.
  • 10/8/2019 The title of this column, a quote from comedian W.C. Fields, refers to his penchant for drinking alcohol. So what do alcohol and W.C. Fields have to do with my topic of rosacea? Read on. 
    Rosacea is a common skin condition usually found on the face, which can be a great source of consternation. It is a disease with various clinical signs. These can include redness/flushing, coarse skin, and bumps and pustules resembling acne. It may also present with visible superficial blood vessels called telangiectasias. 
  • 10/1/2019 I’ve had a number of requests to re-run my column on shingles. I think the increased interest has been brought on by the television ads for the Shingrix® vaccine to help prevent shingles. These ads are quite accurate and compelling. I’ve had quite a few patients who have recently been suffering from this malady, two quite severely.
  • 8/26/2019 The joy of summer sports and yard work has resulted in a number of patients coming to see me complaining of sore shoulders, elbows, hips and knees. Many of these folks have been suffering from bursitis. Most of you have probably heard the term, but what is it? 
    Any time a medical term ends in the suffix “itis,” it indicates inflammation of the tissue or organ involved. In this case, bursitis is an inflammation of a bursa (pleural bursae or bursas). Bursa is Latin for purse, a very good descriptor of what it looks like – a small sac made of connective tissue. 
    A bursa is lined by a synovial membrane that secretes fluid into the sac. This turns the bursa in to a little pillow filled with a slippery liquid that helps cushion structures around it, while allowing them to glide more easily over each other. You can have fun with the kids (or yourself) by making your own model of a bursa. Put a little water in a small balloon and put an object like a book on top of it and roll it around on the table to get an idea of how bursas work. 
    Our bodies contain many bursas. The ones that cause the most problems are found in the shoulder, elbow, hip, and knee. These joints are fairly complex and have many bones, tendons and ligaments that intersect and move over each other. Without the aid of bursas, these structures would rub together, causing a lot of pain as well as wear and tear.
Looking for something older? Try our archive search

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Site Search



Our app is now available!

     
    



© 2019 The Times
a division of Sagamore News Media
54 N 9th Street, Noblesville, IN

(317) 770-7777

life

Software © 1998-2019 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved