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  • A Big Thank You
    9/14/2018 Dear Editor,
    A big thank you for the lovely gift of the piano I played for about 70 years for the Queen Contest.
    I really liked the piano and the beautiful girls and their apparel.
    Also, about three years ago, the 4-H Council awarded me a beautiful wristwatch, which I am enjoying.
    Thank you all very much and may God bless you all.
    -Phyllis E. Davis, Noblesville
  • 9/14/2018 As a Hoosier, I’m proud of the way Noblesville responded to its recent tragic school shooting. The response brought out the best in us, and it is worth noting, Mayor John Ditslear. My admiration and prayers go out to a brave teacher and a student who was truly an innocent victim.
    At the same time, I join other Hoosiers concerned that the Noblesville response to the Indiana Transportation Museum has brought out the worst in our legal system. Under the guise of environmental concern, the city has retained attorneys to figuratively “bleed the museum dry” with the excuse that they are merely paying more for a railyard clean-up at Forest Park. Countless other cities, including ours, have several environmental issues, but attempting to bankrupt a nonprofit organization is not the way to go about it.
  • 8/16/2018 Dear Editor,
    When it comes to vehicle safety, the brake system is at the top of the list. Brake Safety Awareness Month is the ideal time for drivers to stop and make sure their brakes are working properly before the new school year and colder temperatures arrive.
    Motorists can put a stop to any potential brake problems by recognizing the signs and symptoms that their brake system may need maintenance or repair. Typical warning signs include the car pulling to the left or right, noises when applying the brakes, an illuminated brake warning light, brake grabbing, low pedal feel, vibration, hard pedal feel and squealing. Several factors that affect brake wear include driving habits, vehicle type, operating conditions and the quality of the brake lining material.
    For routine maintenance, drivers should check their vehicle’s braking system at least once a year. A thorough inspection should include brake lining wear, brake fluid level, rotor thickness, condition of hoses and brake lines, brake and dash warning lights, as well as taking the car for a test drive to detect other potential brake system problems.
    Drivers should never put off routine brake inspections or any needed repair, such as letting the brakes get to the “metal-to-metal” point, which can be potentially dangerous and lead to a more costly repair bill.
  • 8/16/2018 Dear Editor,
    As a member of the federal community who served our country for years, I am concerned with an attempt to force current U.S. Postal Service retirees onto Medicare Part B, after they previously declined this coverage. While hailed as a way to improve USPS' finances, this is nothing more than balancing the books on the backs of seniors. 
    Why should retirees, who spent their careers serving this nation, be forced to pay an additional $134 per month, or more, for health coverage they previously deemed unnecessary? Mandatory Medicare Part B coverage was never part of the agreement made upon employment, and it should not be forced on any postal retiree, especially retroactively. 
    Congress is currently attempting to fix the Postal Service's problems by shifting costs to Medicare. I urge our legislators to reject the current postal reform bill, H.R. 756. Retired postal workers proudly served our community and promises to them should be kept.
  • 8/7/2018 

    We, as many of you, were horrified to learn of the shooting at Noblesville West Middle School this past May.

    Schools are central hubs of our community and should be safe havens for young people. When that security is shaken, it can be terrifying for students, educators, and families.

    As much as we were shocked by this shooting, at Prevail we see the effects of horrific acts of violence in our community every single day. Everyday, our advocates help people who have experienced devastating events cope with their trauma. Everyday, kids, teens, and adults fill our offices and share their own stories of violence, emotional abuse, stalking, and sexual assault.

    Hamilton County is remarkably safe, especially when compared to many other places across the state and even the country. We have incredible assets and strengths that offer opportunities and advantages many places lack. Our schools are top-notch, our parks are pristine, our law enforcement agencies are responsive, and there’s always something fun to do. While these resources contribute to a wonderful sense of security, we cannot ignore the gaps in our community. We cannot turn a blind eye to our friends and neighbors who are struggling.

    One of the greatest assets our community offers is the wide array of service agencies and community orga

  • 7/31/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    It’s hard to believe that anti-Semitic resentment against Jews could exist in Hamilton County today – the top-ranked county in Indiana for household income, educational attainment and population growth. Yet the vandalism of Congregation Shaarey Tefilla in Carmel with Nazi symbols is proof that such hatred exists – and the time has come to recognize this type of crime for what it is.

    It was a hate crime, which the Federal Bureau of Investigations defines as a “criminal offense against a person or property motivated in whole or in part by an offender’s bias against a race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, or gender identity.”

    Unfortunately, this is not an isolated incident. We have witnessed other disgusting acts of anti-Semitism, racism and bigotry elsewhere in Hamilton County. Earlier in 2018, a video shared on social media showed a Noblesville teenager wearing a Nazi flag draped over his shoulders as he shouted racial and ethnic slurs in Forest Park. 

  • 7/31/2018 

    Dear Editor,

    As the new school year approaches, I’m thinking less about new crayons and backpacks and more about school safety.

    As an educator with more than 20 years of experience, and now as CEO of Girl Scouts of Central Indiana, keeping our schools safe needs to go deeper than what is being discussed. Mental health services, wrap-around services, and providing a climate of inclusion and kindness, must be part of the solution.

    After each act of school violence, it is revealed that a student without a sense of connection to a teacher, a classmate, a club or other activity was in desperate need of attention – more attention than can be provided by our schools, who have limited resources.

  • 7/26/2018 Dear Editor,

    And dear Sen. Victoria Spartz (District 20):

    The Hoosier State Press Association thanks you for supporting S.E.A. 392.

    The bill signed into law on March 21 by Gov. Eric Holcomb contains language that guarantees Hoosiers can obtain electronic records (such as Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, or Adobe pdfs) in that format from state and local government units. The records can be emailed to the requester with no copying fee involved.

    Under the existing Access to Public Records Act, a public official could decide to only provide a printed copy of such a record and require the requester to come to the agency office and pay a copying fee for the record.
  • 7/25/2018 

    Dear Editor, 

    When talking with Hoosiers with disabilities, I have many times heard the frustration of not being able to save money and remain eligible for government benefits, such as SSI and Medicaid.

    Since 1993, individuals with disabilities have been able to save their own money in special needs trusts, such as The Arc of Indiana Master Trust; however, last year the State of Indiana gave Hoosiers another way to save money. This program is called INvestABLE Indiana.

    It gives me great pride to serve on the INvestABLE Indiana board, where we serve to grow and develop this crucial program for Indiana. With this account, Hoosiers receiving SSI can save up to $100,000. If they are not receiving SSI they can save up to $450,000. There is a limit to how much a person can put in their INvestABLE account each year ($15,000) but that can continue each year until the account reaches the maximum allowed balance.

  • 7/24/2018 

    Dear Editor, 

    And dear Sen. James Buck (R-Kokomo, District 21):

    The Hoosier State Press Association thanks you for supporting S.E.A. 392. The bill signed into law on March 21, by Gov. Eric Holcomb contains language that guarantees Hoosiers can obtain electronic records (such as Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, or Adobe pdfs) in that format from state and local government units. The records can be emailed to the requester with no copying fee involved.

    Under the existing Access to Public Records Act, a public official could decide to only provide a printed copy of such a record and require the requester to come to the agency office and pay a copying fee for the record.

    S.E.A. 392 also clarifies items county commissioners and town boards can discuss in “administrative functions” meetings. Existing Open Door Law language outlines what can’t be done, but doesn’t give much direction as to what can be discussed.

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